5 Steps to Safely Train Around Lower Back Pain

5 Steps to Safely Train Around Lower Back Pain:

1) Know your anatomy.

You have to know what muscles are involved in the exercise routine. If you don’t know what muscle do, then it’s better not to perform any kind of exercise at all! (Unless you’re a professional athlete!) So, if you want to train around lower back pain, first of all learn how your body works and then start doing some simple exercises.

2) Do it right.

There are several things you need to pay attention to when performing any type of exercise routine. First, make sure that you do not injure yourself during the exercise routine. Second, make sure that you do not hurt other people while performing the exercise routine.

Third, make sure that you do not injure your joints or other parts of your body while performing the exercise routine. Fourth, make sure that you do not damage your skin while performing the exercise routine. Fifth, make sure that you do not injure your eyes while performing the exercise routine. Sixth, make sure that you do not get injured while lifting heavy weights or doing other dangerous activities while performing the exercise routine.

3) Perform it every day.

Make sure that you perform the same exercise routine for at least one week before changing anything else in your program. Doing so will ensure that you won’t suffer from any injuries during the rest of your life!

4) Do it correctly.

If you want to train around lower back pain, then you have to follow the correct form while doing any type of exercise. If you’re an adult and you’re performing an exercise that involves a heavy weight, then you have to make sure that you do not do any sort of “bouncing” motion with the weight.

Why?

Because bouncing the weight is dangerous and it can lead to several injuries such as tendonitis, muscle strains and even torn muscles.

5 Steps to Safely Train Around Lower Back Pain - GymFitWorkout

5) Avoid the most dangerous exercises.

If you want to train around lower back pain, then you should avoid doing certain types of exercises such as deadlifts, squats, power cleans, wide-grip pull-ups and many others. There are several reasons why these exercises are dangerous. First of all, there’s a big risk of tearing tendons or muscles in your back.

Second, there’s also a risk of herniating a disc in your back. And third, there’s also a risk of damaging the joints in your back.

That’s all folks!

If you want to train around lower back pain, then you have to make sure you avoid certain types of exercises. There are several factors that can cause lower back pain such as bad posture, muscle weakness, muscle imbalance and many others.

In general, there are three types of discs in your back: the central discs, the peripheral discs and the transitional discs. Out of all three, the central disc is more prone to injury because it sits in the exact middle of your back.

In addition, you also have twelve pairs of spinal bones (vertebrae) and they can shift out of place if you don’t strengthen your core enough.

Also, your spinal cord is very sensitive and any type of injury can lead to serious pain.

All three factors (central disc, peripheral disc and spinal bones) can lead to pain in your lower back. In addition, there are several factors that can lead to pain in your lower back such as muscle weakness, muscle imbalance and others.

For example, if you sit at a desk for several hours every day, then you have muscles that are weak (hip flexors, abdominals and lower back) and you also have muscles that are too strong (pecs, biceps and triceps). This is very common among office workers and it can lead to serious pain.

5 Steps to Safely Train Around Lower Back Pain - GYM FIT WORKOUT

Also, if you have a muscle imbalance then it can lead to serious pain as well. For example, if you have weak abdominals and strong hip flexors, then your body has to compensate for that weakness in some way. In this case, your body has to curl forward (rounding your back) in order to allow your abdominals to do their job correctly.

This is a type of muscle imbalance and it can lead to serious pain.

Sources & references used in this article:

Changeology: 5 steps to realizing your goals and resolutions by JC Norcross – 2012 – books.google.com

Effect of short-term intensive yoga program on pain, functional disability and spinal flexibility in chronic low back pain: a randomized control study by P Tekur, C Singphow, HR Nagendra… – The journal of …, 2008 – liebertpub.com

Lumbar segmentalinstability’: clinical presentation and specific stabilizing exercise management by PB O’Sullivan – Manual therapy, 2000 – academia.edu

Prevalence of back pain and characteristics of the physical workload of community nurses by JJ Knibbe, RD Friele – Ergonomics, 1996 – Taylor & Francis

Risk: A practical guide for deciding what’s really safe and what’s dangerous in the world around you by D Ropeik, GM Gray – 2002 – books.google.com

Weight training: steps to success by TR Baechle, RW Earle – 2019 – books.google.com

Evidence-based practices for safe patient handling and movement by A Nelson, A Baptiste – Online journal of issues in nursing, 2004 – seiu1991.org

Core strengthening by V Akuthota, SF Nadler – Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation, 2004 – Elsevier

Investigation of comfort level and passenger seat design (side lower berth) in sleeper class coaches in Indian trains: an exploratory study by LP Singh – International journal of manufacturing …, 2012 – inderscienceonline.com