A CrossFitter’s Guide to Interval Weight Training

What Is Interval Training?

Interval training consists of short bursts of exercise separated by periods of rest. The intervals are generally shorter than the rest periods, which means they’re very intense. For example, if you do one minute at maximum intensity followed by two minutes at moderate intensity, then you’ve done a “high-intensity” interval workout. If you do three minutes at moderate intensity followed by five minutes at low intensity, then you’ve done a “moderate-intensity” interval workout. You could also say that it’s a combination of both high-intensity and moderate-intensity workouts.

The purpose of interval training is to increase your cardiovascular fitness while burning fat and improving your metabolic rate (the energy used by the body). Aerobic exercise increases blood flow to muscles, increasing their size and strength. Anaerobic exercise (like running or cycling) uses oxygen to create energy. When you use both types of exercise together, your heart beats faster and pumps more blood through the body.

Why Do I Need To Work Out With Intervals?

You need to work out because:

Your heart rate goes up when you run fast or jump rope. Your metabolism slows down when you walk briskly or sit quietly for long periods of time.

The first type of exercise is anaerobic. It gets your heart pumping and your blood flowing. The more you do it, the more you’ll burn fat and drop weight quickly, but this type of exercise does not burn fat for long. This is why you need to work out with intervals to keep the fat burning after your session is over.

Intervals train both the anaerobic and aerobic systems together, which is even more effective than working out with just one or the other.

Interval training requires your muscles to work harder, which builds and strengthens them. When you increase muscle mass, your body increases its metabolic rate. The more muscle you have, the more calories you burn at rest. This is why people who are involved in strength training or mixed martial arts have a much easier time keeping their weight down.

Most interval training workouts are less than thirty minutes. Longer than that, and the intensity is so great that you may not be able to exercise for a day or two after. Because you’re working out for shorter periods of time, you can exercise more frequently. This yields results in less time than traditional half-hour workouts three times a week.

High-Intensity Interval Training

High-intensity interval training (otherwise known as HIIT) involves twenty seconds of very high-intensity exercise followed by ten seconds of rest. You should work at about 90 to 95 percent of your maximum capacity of aerobic exertion. If you’re not sure about your maximum, start off with a lower number and work up to a higher number over time.

Each exercise should be done for thirty seconds, followed by a thirty second rest period. After you’ve done all the exercises, repeat the cycle one more time. This is a total of six minutes of working out.

Here are some sample exercises:

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Jogging in place

Alternating jumping jacks

Side leg raises

Push-ups (If you’re not strong enough to do traditional push-ups, you can do different variations like incline push-ups or even press-ups against a wall.)

Bicep curls with weights (2.5 lbs. or less)

Tricep dips on bench or chair

Jumping rope

Most people can devote a half hour to an hour three times a week to exercise. If you don’t have that much time, try HIGH-5’s Ten-Ten-Hundred program. Walk or jog slowly for ten minutes, do ten minutes of moderate aerobic activity, then top it off with ten minutes of high intensity aerobics. This is a thirty minute workout that can be done five days a week.

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If you have more time and are looking for a greater challenge, try this twelve-week program:

Week One:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 1 mile.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 1 mile, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 1.5 miles, walk 0.5 mile, jog 1 mile, rest 1 minute after every mile.

Week Two:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 1.5 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 1.5 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 2 miles, walk 0.5 mile, jog 1.5 miles, rest 1 minute after every mile.

Week Three:

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Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 2 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 2 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 2 miles, walk 0.5 mile, jog 2 miles, rest 1 minute after every mile.

Week Four:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 2.5 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 2.5 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 3 miles, walk 0.5 mile, jog 2.5 miles, rest 1 minute after every mile.

Week Five:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 3 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 3 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

A CrossFitter’s Guide to Interval Weight Training - GymFitWorkout

Day three: Jog 3 miles, walk 1 mile, jog 2 miles, rest 1 minute after every mile.

Week Six:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 4 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 4 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 4 miles, walk 1 mile, jog 3 miles, rest 1 minute after every mile.

Week Seven:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 5 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 5 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 5 miles, walk 1 mile, jog 3 miles, rest 1 minute after every mile.

Week Eight:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 6 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 6 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

A CrossFitter’s Guide to Interval Weight Training - gym fit workout

Day three: Jog 6 miles, walk 1 mile, jog 3 miles, rest 1 minute after every mile.

Week Nine:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 7 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 7 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 7 miles, walk 1 mile, jog 4 miles, rest 1 minute after every mile.

Week Ten:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 8 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 8 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

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Day three: Jog 8 miles, walk 1 mile, jog 4 miles, rest 1 minute after every mile.

Week Eleven:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 9 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 9 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 9 miles, walk 1 mile, jog 4 miles, rest 1 minute after every mile.

Week Twelve:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 10 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 10 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

A CrossFitter’s Guide to Interval Weight Training - GYM FIT WORKOUT

Day three: Jog 10 miles, walk 1 mile, jog 5 miles, rest 1 minute after every mile.

Week Thirteen:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 11 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 11 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 11 miles, walk 1 mile, jog 5 miles, rest 1 minute after every mile.

Week Fourteen:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 12 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 12 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 12 miles, walk 1 mile, jog 6 miles, rest 1 minute after every mile.

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Week Fifteen:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 14 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 14 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 14 miles, walk 1 mile, jog 7 miles, rest 2 minute after every mile.

Week Sixteen:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 16 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 16 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 18 miles, walk 1 mile, jog 8 miles, rest 2 minute after every mile.

Week Seventeen:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 18 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 18 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

A CrossFitter’s Guide to Interval Weight Training - | Gym Fit Workout

Day three: Jog 20 miles, walk 1 mile, jog 9 miles, rest 2 minute after every mile.

Week Eighteen:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 20 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 20 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 22 miles, walk 1 mile, jog 11 miles, rest 2 minute after every mile.

Week Nineteen:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 22 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 22 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 25 miles, walk 1 mile, jog 14 miles, rest 2 minute after every mile.

Week Twenty:

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Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 25 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 25 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 30 miles, walk 1 mile, jog 16 miles, rest 2 minute after every mile.

Week Twenty-One:

You may now start to slow down your running pace. You can continue this plan as long as you like, but you might want to start varying your routine at this point to avoid a plateau effect.

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 30 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 30 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 40 miles, walk 2 miles, jog 20 miles, rest 2 minute after every mile.

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Week Twenty-Two:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 35 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 35 miles, resting for 1 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 50 miles, walk 2 miles, jog 25 miles, rest 3 minute after every mile.

Week Twenty-Three:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 40 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 40 miles, resting for 2 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 50 miles, walk 3 miles, jog 30 miles, rest 3 minute after every mile.

Week Twenty-Four:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 45 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 45 miles, resting for 2 minute after every 2 miles.

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Day three: Jog 60 miles, walk 3 miles, jog 35 miles, rest 3 minute after every mile.

Week Twenty-Five:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 50 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 50 miles, resting for 2 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 70 miles, walk 3 miles, jog 40 miles, rest 4 minute after every mile.

Week Twenty-Six:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 55 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 55 miles, resting for 2 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 80 miles, walk 4 miles, jog 45 miles, rest 5 minute after every mile.

A CrossFitter’s Guide to Interval Weight Training - | Gym Fit Workout

Week Twenty-Seven:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 60 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 60 miles, resting for 2 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 90 miles, walk 4 miles, jog 50 miles, rest 5 minute after every mile.

Week Twenty-Eight:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 65 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 65 miles, resting for 2 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 60 miles, walk 4 miles, jog 55 miles, rest 5 minute after every mile.

Week Twenty-Nine:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 70 miles.

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Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 70 miles, resting for 2 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 80 miles, walk 5 miles, jog 60 miles, rest 6 minute after every mile.

Week Thirty:

Day one: Walk or jog at an easy pace for 75 miles.

Day two: Alternate walking and jogging for 75 miles, resting for 2 minute after every 2 miles.

Day three: Jog 90 miles, walk 5 miles, jog 70 miles, rest 7 minute after every mile.

Congratulations! You have completed the 30 week training plan. Now that you have reached this goal, you will have no problems running a 5k! The next step is to run a 10k.

You should still continue your walking and jogging routine for at least another 30 weeks before attempting a 10k race. 5ks and 10ks are the most popular races, but there is no reason to stop at 10k. Once you can easily run a 10k, then move on to the half-marathon, then the full marathon. You can do it!

Questions?

Ask me anything!

Now the next step is to run a 10k. Here is a training schedule that will prepare you to complete that goal in the shortest amount of time. This plan is more intensive than the last one so make sure you are confident that you are able to proceed because you will not have a chance to pause or cease the plan until after the 10k race:

Run 3 days a week. I’ll be happy to answer!

Good luck!

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Sources & references used in this article:

Investigating the organisational culture of CrossFit by B Bailey, AJ Benson, MW Bruner – International Journal of Sport …, 2019 – Taylor & Francis

THE HISTORY OF THE DEVELOPMENT TRAINING” CROSSFIT” by YA Vedjaskin, RM Shipilov… – Международный научно …, 2016 – cyberleninka.ru

Challenge, commitment, community, and empowerment: Factors that promote the adoption of CrossFit as a training program by M Ryan Shuda, Y Feito – Transformation, 2017 – researchgate.net

The history of the development training «Crossfit» by EE Marinich, RM Shipilov – Международный научно …, 2016 – research-journal.org

The Definitive Guide to Metabolic Flexibility by M Sisson – marksdailyapple.com