An Idiot’s Guide to Progressive Conditioning Workouts

An Idiot’s Guide to Progressive Conditioning Workouts

The first thing you need to do when starting out with progressive conditioning workouts is make sure your diet is in order. If you are not eating enough calories, then you will not gain weight and if you aren’t gaining weight, then it won’t matter how hard you train.

If you want to get stronger, then you have to eat enough food so that your body can use it properly. You may think that the best way to do this is just eat more, but this isn’t necessarily true.

There are other ways such as eating less and doing cardio instead or even both at the same time. A good rule of thumb is that you should consume around 1,000 calories per day (1 pound = 2,000 calories).

One of the most effective things you can do to increase your strength is to increase your calorie intake. One of the main reasons why people fail at getting strong is because they don’t eat enough.

They overeat which causes them to gain fat and not gain any muscle mass. When you eat more, your body burns up all those extra calories in order to maintain its current size.

This is the main factor in how to gain weight. It’s not about eating whatever you want so much as it is about how much you eat.

You need to eat more if you want to gain weight, but not so much that all you’re doing is storing fat.

An Idiot's Guide to Progressive Conditioning Workouts - Image

The next step is to work on the quality of the food that you consume. You should be eating complex carbohydrates such as potatoes, brown rice, oatmeal, and whole grain bread.

However, you should not be eating simple sugars such as those that are in candy or soft drinks.

You need to consume a lot of protein in your diet. This is needed in order to build new and stronger muscles.

One of the best sources of this is meat and poultry, but you can also get it from cheese and other dairy products.

Eat every 2-3 hours and make sure that you eat until you are full. Don’t eat so much that you feel sick, but don’t stop eating until you’re no longer hungry.

Eat slower burning complex carbohydrates such as potatoes, brown rice, oatmeal, and whole grain breads.

Make sure to cut out simple sugars such as those found in candy or soft drinks.

Eat a lot of protein. The best sources for this are meat and poultry, but you can also get it from cheese and other dairy products.

Sources & references used in this article:

Deliberate performance: Accelerating expertise in natural settings by K Karter, G Mezger – 2000 – Penguin

A CBT-practitioner’s guide to ACT: How to bridge the gap between cognitive behavioral therapy and acceptance and commitment therapy by J Allen – 2002 – Penguin

METTLE: Mental toughness training for law enforcement by PJ Fadde, GA KleinĀ – Performance Improvement, 2010 – Wiley Online Library

Suspension Training as an Exercise Method by J Ciarrochi, A Bailey – 2008 – books.google.com