Awake & Evolve: Cycle 2 – Mind’s Eye Meditation

Awake & Evolve: Cycle 2 – Mind’s Eye Meditation

The first part of this article will tell you about the vision in your mind while meditating. The second part will give you some tips to see it better.

You have seen many times when someone was meditating and they were having a very strong dream or vision. You thought that it was just their imagination, but now you are going to learn why such dreams occur during meditation.

When you meditate, your brain produces special chemicals called endorphins which make you feel good. When these endorphins reach the area where your visual cortex is located, they cause the blood vessels there to dilate causing a bright light effect. Your brain then interprets this light as being real and not imagined like if it was actually happening in front of you.

So what happens when you do this?

Your visual cortex sends signals to your brain stem, which causes you to fall asleep. Then your body goes into deep sleep due to lack of oxygen. During this time you experience a vivid dreamlike state similar to lucid dreaming. You may even remember the whole thing!

Now that you know this, you can use your knowledge apply it to yourself and have fun. If you don’t believe it works, try it out and see for yourself.

To see your brain light up in vivid color, all you have to do is stare into the darkness with your eyes closed. After a few minutes of doing this, you will notice different colors appearing before your eyes. This is not a hallucination; it is your natural brain activity that you otherwise would not see. It is really intriguing to watch as the light show varies in colors.

Besides watching a light show, you can also enjoy having a visual dream while you are in a meditative state. Since you know what to expect, you can direct yourself to what you wish to see. It may start as a faint image before your eyes, but with practice it will get clearer. The more you use meditating for looking at pictures in your head, the better you will get at it.

Have fun and enjoy yourself, but do not overdo it. If you feel yourself getting dizzy or disoriented, then stop for a while and give your brain time to rest.

Our ancestors knew how to access these areas of the brain and bring out our hidden talents and abilities. Through years of practice they eventually unlocked everything that we have within us. Too bad our modern lifestyle does not encourage such things.

Nowadays, only those gifted with the ability to see auras can do this. If you meet someone who claims they can, then you should try and get yourself to a quiet place so you can see what they are talking about. It’s very fascinating — the first time that you see an aura it is hard to describe the feeling that comes over you. You might even become afraid of what you are seeing.

Over time, you will learn to block these visions out of your mind. Such things are only confusing to the untrained mind. Try not to give in to curiosity.

Awake & Evolve: Cycle 2 - Mind's Eye Meditation - | Gym Fit Workout

Practice your new skills in private. In time you will be able to put on a show for your friends and family. Soon you will be able to control what you see, but this takes lots of practice and patience. Just relax, and try not to get frustrated if you don’t get the results that you want right away.

You can do it.

As long as you stick with these lessons, in time you will be able to do some very interesting things.

Who knows?

Maybe you will discover some new techniques of your own.

Good luck and have fun.

Sources & references used in this article:

Local sleep in awake rats by VV Vyazovskiy, U Olcese, EC Hanlon, Y Nir, C Cirelli… – Nature, 2011 – nature.com

Thresholds of focal cerebral ischemia in awake monkeys by TH Jones, RB Morawetz, RM Crowell… – Journal of …, 1981 – thejns.org

Awake hippocampal sharp-wave ripples support spatial memory by SP Jadhav, C Kemere, PW German, LM Frank – Science, 2012 – science.sciencemag.org

Atrial fibrillation begets atrial fibrillation: a study in awake chronically instrumented goats by MCEF Wijffels, CJHJ Kirchhof, R Dorland, MA Allessie – Circulation, 1995 – Am Heart Assoc

Awake replay of remote experiences in the hippocampus by MP Karlsson, LM Frank – Nature neuroscience, 2009 – nature.com