Balance and Efficiency: A Method to Stabilize Your Body

The body has many functions. For instance, it supports your weight while walking or running, and also helps you stand up from sitting down. If you have problems with balance, then you need to learn how to stabilize your body properly. There are several ways of doing so. You can do exercises such as balancing on one leg or using a stick for balance, but these methods may not always work well because they require strength and coordination skills that most people lack.

Another way of stabilizing your body is through use of a special type of muscle called a stabilizer muscle. These muscles are located at the base of your spine and help keep your spine stable when you walk or run.

They also provide support for other parts of the body such as your arms, hands, fingers, toes and knees. Most people don’t realize that their stabilizers are weak and that they could benefit from strengthening them.

Stabilizer muscles are found mainly in the lower back, hips and thighs. However, they can also be found in your shoulders and neck.

Some types of stabilizers include:

Core Muscles (also known as Rectus Abdominis) – located between your ribs, these muscles help control your trunk and keep it straight. They also act as shock absorbers for your bones when you fall down from a high place.

Deep Abdominal Muscles – the deepest layer of abdominal muscles are located between your transversus abdominis muscles and your innermost layer of obliques. They help keep your trunk straight.

Spinal Erector Muscles – these long, thin muscles run along the length of your back and help you to stay upright. They are the main support for your body weight when you are standing or sitting up.

Neck Muscles – these muscles are located on top of your spine and support your head. Weak neck muscles can lead to poor posture and a forward head carriage (rounding of your shoulders).

Arms and Hands

Weak arm muscles can cause the arms to hang in an awkward position, making it difficult to perform tasks that require fine movements such as writing or working on a computer. They can also make your shoulders look rounded and slouched.

Balance and Efficiency: A Method to Stabilize Your Body - at GYMFITWORKOUT

Weak hand muscles may result in a lack of finger strength and the inability to hold small objects such as a pencil or a fork firmly.

What are Stabilizer Muscles?

Most people don’t realize that their stabilizer muscles are weak and that they could benefit from strengthening them. If you have weak stabilizer muscles, your body can not handle the forces of gravity and momentum as efficiently as it should, which can lead to problems with your posture.

What are the Symptoms of Weak Stabilizer Muscles?

Weak stabilizer muscles can lead to poor posture and a forward head carriage (rounding of your shoulders). Being weak, they may tire easily and cause you to shake or shiver if they are exposed to the cold. They can also make your arms hang in an awkward position, making it difficult to perform tasks that require fine movements such as writing or working on a computer.

How are Stabilizer Muscles Strengthened?

You can strengthen your stabilizer muscles in a number of ways. Some of the more traditional exercises to help them are:

Walking or Jogging – Regular walking or jogging at a moderate pace is a good way to strengthen your core muscles. When you walk or run, your trunk muscles are required to work in a steady rhythm in order to keep you balanced and moving forward.

Swimming – Swimming can also be a good way of strengthening your core muscles. When you swim, the force of water acting against your body requires your core muscles to work harder in order to keep your body moving through the water with as little resistance as possible.

Yoga – Yoga is a good way of strengthening your core muscles and improving their flexibility at the same time. The exercise stretches and tones your muscles, increases your agility and promotes body awareness.

If you want to focus on strengthening your core muscles, you could try one of these three activities on a regular basis.

What Else Affects the Strength of My Stabilizer Muscles?

If you spend a lot of time sitting at a desk or working on a computer, the strength of your core muscles can become weakened over time. When you sit or lean forward, your body weight is being supported by your skeleton rather than the muscles of your legs and lower back. Your posture suffers as your back becomes rounded and your shoulders hunch forward. Muscle wastage can also occur as your body decides that it is not necessary to maintain muscle strength that it doesn’t really need.

What are the Symptoms of Weakened Stabilizer Muscles?

Sources & references used in this article:

The effects of plyometric vs. dynamic stabilization and balance training on power, balance, and landing force in female athletes by GD Myer, KR Ford, JL Brent, TE Hewett – Journal of strength and …, 2006 – Citeseer

A comparison between core exercises with Theraband and Swiss Ball in terms of core stabilization and balance performance by P Aksen-Cengizhan, D Onay, O Sever… – … and Exercise Science, 2018 – content.iospress.com

Computation of unsteady nonlinear flows in cascades using a harmonic balance technique by KC Hall, JP Thomas, WS Clark – AIAA journal, 2002 – arc.aiaa.org

The effects of plyometric versus dynamic stabilization and balance training on lower extremity biomechanics by GD Myer, KR Ford, SG McLean… – The American journal …, 2006 – journals.sagepub.com

Athletic body in balance by G Cook – 2003 – books.google.com

The interacting effects of cognitive demand and recovery of postural stability in balance-impaired elderly persons by SG Brauer, M Woollacott… – The Journals of …, 2001 – academic.oup.com

Active control of lateral balance in human walking by CE Bauby, AD Kuo – Journal of biomechanics, 2000 – Elsevier

Stabilization of lateral motion in passive dynamic walking by AD Kuo – The International journal of robotics research, 1999 – journals.sagepub.com

The effects of a five-week core stabilization-training program on dynamic balance in tennis athletes by KM Samson – 2005 – search.proquest.com