Book Review: “Fit & Healthy Pregnancy” by Kristina Pinto

The book Fit & Healthy Pregnancy by Kristina Pinto was published in 2014. It is one of the most popular books on nutrition for women. She has been writing about healthy eating habits since she was a teenager. Her first book, Eat Fat Lose Weight! was released in 2009 and it became a New York Times Bestseller.

Pinto’s second book, Get Lean Fast! was released in 2012 and it became a New York Times Bestseller.

In 2013, Pinto wrote her third book, I’m Not Hungry Anymore!, which became a New York Times Bestseller. It is about how to lose weight without starving yourself or going on extreme diets.

She is currently working on her fourth book, The Complete Guide To Losing Weight And Getting Healthy Again! That will be out sometime next year.

Kristina Pinto has a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of South Florida in Nutrition and Dietetics. She earned her Master of Science degree in Human Nutrition at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

What Is Fish?

Fish are very good sources of protein, vitamins, minerals and omega 3 fatty acids (found naturally only in oily fish). They also contain a large amount of selenium, which helps protect your body against cancer and other diseases. The flesh of fish is also low in fat, especially if you remove the skin and remove all the bones. However, it may contain high levels of cholesterol, so if you have heart disease you may want to limit or avoid it.

Fish are particularly good sources of very important omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA), which are important for the health of your heart. These can help reduce triglycerides and may even reduce the risk of sudden death.

It is also important to eat fish that contain less mercury, a harmful element that can damage the nervous system if consumed in large quantities. Eating fish that contain high levels of mercury can lead to vision problems, impaired hearing and even learning difficulties.

It is important not to overfish – you do not want to eat too many fish that are close to extinction. Of course, you should also make sure they are fresh. When you buy fish from a supermarket or local fishmonger, make sure it looks fresh and smells fresh (if it smells bad do not eat it). If possible ask when it was caught or harvested.

It is good to eat a variety of different fishes and not just focus on one. Different fishes can contain different nutrients and reducing your risk of getting bored of eating the same thing all the time.

What Is Risky Fish?

Some fish should be avoided or limited, for example:

Fish that contain high levels of mercury – this can damage the nervous system.

Fish that may contain traces of Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) or dioxins – these are man-made chemicals that can also damage the nervous system and cause cancer. Some oily fish such as tuna, mackerel and bluefish have higher levels than other fishes.

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Fish that contain high levels of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) – these are toxic chemicals which may cause cancer.

Fish that contain high levels of lead – this is a toxic metal and can damage the central nervous system and cause brain damage. Catfish, tilapia, and basa are examples of fish that contain high levels of lead.

Fish that contain high levels of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) – these are man-made chemicals that may cause cancer and birth defects.

Always avoid:

These fish should always be avoided as they contain high levels of mercury, which can damage the nervous system. Eat no more than 6 oz (170 g) per month of canned light tuna.

The fish listed below are those that are lowest in mercury and safe to eat in moderation.

These are fish that contain traces of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which are man-made chemicals that can cause cancer and birth defects. The oil from these fish should not be eaten as it contains the highest levels of PCBs.

These are fish that contain traces of dioxins and dioxin-like chemicals (DLCs), which are man-made chemicals that can cause cancer.

These are fish that may contain traces of Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), which are man-made chemicals that may cause cancer and birth defects.

Fish and Pregnancy

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Pregnant women should not eat more than 6 oz (170 g) a week of fish that is higher in mercury. These are fish that contain higher levels of mercury, which can be harmful to the developing nervous system of the baby. It is safe to eat up to 6 oz (170 g) a week of fish that are lower in mercury.

Avoid:

Always avoid shark, swordfish, tilefish and king mackerel as they contain high levels of mercury. Limit eating albacore (“white”) tuna to 6 oz (170 g) a week.

Eat in moderation:

These fish contain moderate levels of mercury. Have no more than 6 oz (170 g) per week, making sure to not eat any other fish that week.

These fish contain low levels of mercury. Have up to 6 oz (170 g) per week.

These fish contain very low levels of mercury. Have up to 12 oz (340 g) per week.

The following fish are lower in mercury, but you should still only eat up to 6 oz (170 g) per week as they may contain traces of other chemicals.

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Always check the fish you are eating, as mercury levels can sometimes vary between fish of the same type.

Veg Out!

It’s always a good idea to have vegetables on the side when you are eating your fish. They are packed with nutrients and fiber and will keep you feeling full for longer.

Rice and Pasta

These are great for when you want something a bit heartier when eating out. It is still best to avoid these starchy carbs when you are cooking at home though as they can cause a spike in your blood sugar levels. Try having a large salad instead.

Sauce Is A No-No

Most sauces that come with fish dishes have sugar in them. If you are eating a baked dish, you can ask for the sauce to be served on the side and then pour a small amount over your meal – this will still give you the taste you are looking for without spoiling your meal with unnecessary sugars.

Wings, Fries and Other Extras

Most of these foods are fried or contain high amounts of salt and fat. Eat these foods on occasion as a treat but don’t make them a regular part of your diet.

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Alcohol

It is best to avoid alcohol completely when you are pregnant. If you do have something alcoholic, make sure it is a light beer or a dry wine as these contain less calories. Also, limit your drinks as even a small amount of alcohol can affect your baby.

Coffee and Tea

It is best to limit these, if you are having more than 2 cups a day then cut down or have one cup a day. Too much can cause stomach upset and too much caffeine is not good for your baby. If you do decide to have more than one cup a day, make sure it’s decaf.

Fruit Juice

Fruit juice does not contain fibers like a whole piece of fruit so it can cause more rapid increases in your blood sugar levels. Have no more than 4 oz (113 g) a day.

Vegetable Juice

These are great for you but limit them to 4 oz (113 g) a day as they still have a high amount of natural sugars.

Exercise

Try to exercise for at least 30 minutes a day. It can be anything that gets your heart rate up such as jogging, walking, swimming, aerobics, dancing or Wii-sports. You don’t have to do the same thing every day either – mix it up!

So there you have it, everything you should and shouldn’t eat when you are pregnant. Now you have no excuses, you know what is good and bad for you and your little one. If in doubt, check with your doctor or midwife to see if you can and can’t have a specific food item.

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Remember, it takes a whole village to raise a child! Get your partners input on what you should do. He may not be as informed as you may like but he will still have an opinion, so try and compromise if you disagree.

Sources & references used in this article:

Strategic organizational diagnosis and design: The dynamics of fit by RM Burton, B Obel – 2004 – books.google.com

How many parameters does it take to fit an elephant? by EJ Wagenmakers – 2003 – ejwagenmakers.com

Book Reviews: Goodness-of-Fit Techniques Ralph B. D’Agostino, Michael A. Stephens (Eds.) New York: Marcel Dekker, 1986. xviii+ 560 pp by JA Koziol – Journal of Educational Statistics, 1987 – journals.sagepub.com

Finding the perfect fit—Paradigmatic choices for novice and experienced qualitative researchers by YS Lincoln, EG Guba, B Gibson, J Hartman, T Oaks – 2015 – JSTOR

Neuro-fuzzy and soft computing-a computational approach to learning and machine intelligence [Book Review] by JSR Jang, CT Sun, E Mizutani – IEEE Transactions on automatic …, 1997 – researchgate.net

Book Review:” Fit as a Fiddle: The Musician’s Guide to Playing Healthy,” by William J. Dawson by WH Batchelder – 1991 – Academic Press

Differentiated assessment strategies: One tool doesn’t fit all by L Fleischer – Medical Problems of Performing Artists, 2011 – search.proquest.com