Choke: A Movie, a Verb, a Way of Life

Choke: A Movie, a Verb, a Way of Life

A movie is a story told through pictures or words. Most movies are based on true stories. The word “movie” comes from the Latin verb “māter”, which means to tell.

Movies usually have one main character (the director) and several other characters (actors). There are many different types of movies; some are dramas, comedies, horror films and so on.

In the case of movies, there are two kinds of endings: happy ending and sad ending. The first kind is called happy ending because it ends with a good outcome for all the characters involved. The second kind is called sad ending because it ends with a bad outcome for all the characters involved.

Both kinds of endings are acceptable in movies. For example, if someone dies in a movie, then it would be considered as tragic death scene. If someone becomes rich in a movie, then it would be considered as comic relief scene. However, when two people die in a movie, then it would be considered as tragedy ending.

The term “choke” refers to the fact that there are certain scenes where no sound can come out. These scenes are called “chokes”. They occur mainly during the climaxes of movies and they may happen at any time during the film.

These scenes are usually accompanied by sad music (like the one that plays when someone dies). The main character(s) of the movie are usually involved in these scenes.

The word “choke” is also used to describe the act of not being able to say anything. This condition happens mainly during the climaxes of movies. It may also happen at other times during a movie.

Choke: A Movie, a Verb, a Way of Life - gym fit workout

The person who is unable to speak is said to be choking.

It is important to note that the word “choke” may also refer to a type of play in some sports, like basketball. In these cases, the word “choking” is used to describe a sudden decrease in performance level.

Sources & references used in this article:

English verb classes and alternations: A preliminary investigation by B Levin – 1993 – books.google.com

Film Blackness: American Cinema and the Idea of Black Film by MB Gillespie – 2016 – books.google.com

Hammer!: Making Movies out of Sex and Life by B Hammer – 2010 – books.google.com

Is well-being local or global? A perspective from ecopsychology by S Pinker – 2007 – Penguin

A body and its gestures by J Pickering – Well-Being, 2007 – Springer

English file: Upper-intermediate. Student’s book by J Streeck – Gesture, 2002 – jbe-platform.com

A methodology of the heart: Evoking academic and daily life by C Oxenden, C Latham-Koenig, R Barnes-Murphy – 2001 – academia.edu