Do You Need Multiple Sets, or Just One

Do You Need Multiple Sets, or Just One?

The question of whether or not it’s better to do multiple sets with your workout is one that gets asked a lot. There are many opinions out there and some studies have been done on this topic. Some say that multiple sets are necessary while others say they’re unnecessary.

Some believe that doing more than one exercise at once will cause overtraining and burnout. Others claim that if you train too hard, you’ll get injured and never progress anymore. Still other people think that you shouldn’t worry so much about how many exercises you do because when it comes to building muscle mass, the most important thing is just to lift heavy things.

Personally I’m of the opinion that you don’t need to do more than one exercise per session. If you want to add another exercise, then go ahead and do it.

However, if you’re already getting good results from what you’ve got going on right now, why complicate things? Why add something new when you’re already making gains?

Multiple sets or single set?

This is a common question asked among trainers and fitness enthusiasts. The answer, as it usually does, depends. It depends on what your goals are, how much time you have to train, your diet, and many other factors. For some people, performing multiple sets is the best way to go. They may have the time and energy to devote to it and they justify the extra time investment with greater rates of growth. And they may be right!

Others may not have the time or the endurance to pump out sets after sets. They may prefer the single set approach as a time saver and energy saver. An experienced lifter will be able to do just as well with a single heavy set as they would with multiple lighter sets. The body doesn’t know if you’re doing 5 reps or 50 reps, it only perceives stress.

Some people can’t handle doing multiple sets, they get burnt out or overtrained very easily and all sets are eliminated completely.

This article will address the differences between single and multiple sets, the pros and cons of each approach, and which one is best for you.

Single Set vs. Multiple Set Training

The biggest difference between single and multiple set training is that with single set training you only do one set per exercise, while with multiple set training you do multiple sets. You would think that doing more sets would lead to more growth but that’s not necessarily true. The amount of sets that you do doesn’t necessarily determine your growth, it’s how you manage them which determines that.

Multiple sets allows for a greater volume of exercise which can be beneficial. If volume is leading to greater muscle damage then you’re going to get more out of that. If you want to increase muscle mass then multiple sets might be better for you. Single sets don’t allow for as much volume so if you’re looking to do more volume in your training then multiple sets are beneficial.

However, single set training has its own advantages. The main one being that single set training is lower in total stress. This means that your nervous and adrenal systems aren’t nearly as taxed during a single heavy set session than they would be after a multiple set session. This allows you to do more work in a shorter period of time.

If your schedule doesn’t allow for a lot of training time then single set training might be better suited to you.

Which one is better?

Well that depends on what your goals are. If you’re time crunched and you need to get in and get out as quick as you can, then single set training would be the better approach for you. If you have the time to spend and you want to focus on improving your volume and challenging yourself with heavier weights then multiple sets would be a better choice for you.

Pros of Single Set Training

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Single set training is beneficial in that it allows for a quick and efficient workout. You’re not wasting anytime between sets or alternating exercises, you go in and get it done. This is beneficial for people that are very busy or just need to get their training in during lunchtime at work.

If your work or personal life requires a lot of your time then single set training is a better choice for you because it allows you to get your training in without taking up too much of your free time.

Cons of Single Set Training

Single set training is beneficial in that it allows for a quick and efficient workout but that can also be a disadvantage. Because you’re not doing multiple sets per exercise you’re not working the muscles as hard. This can allow for some quick growth initially if you jump into single set training from doing no training whatsoever but if your goal is to increase muscle mass over the long term then multiple sets are going to be necessary.

You can’t rely on single set training exclusively if your goal is to increase muscle mass. You’re going to have to add weight each time you repeat a certain exercise in order to keep the challenge there and this is only possible with multiple sets. If you’re just doing one heavy set then you’re not going to be able to increase the weight each time.

You will get stronger initially from just adding weight to the same exercise over and over again but at some point you’re not going to be able to keep up that progress when using single sets alone because your body will adapt and no longer be challenged the way that it should be.

It’s also not a good idea to do single set training right off the bat if you’re a beginner. Your body isn’t used to the movement patterns or the stresses of exercise and it can be very easy to get hurt if you attempt a heavy single set session when you first start out.

Cons of Multiple Set Training

One of the biggest problems with multiple set training is that it is stressful on the body. It takes a longer time to recover in between workouts and it’s easy to overtrain if you’re not paying attention or do too much volume.

If your goal is more focused on fat loss then multiple sets are definitely not ideal because of the time factor involved in trying to circulate the blood and burn the fat while you wait around for your muscles to recover. You have to keep circulating the blood and burning fat in order for the cardiovascular aspect of your training to be as effective as possible.

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If your goal is to decrease your body fat % over the long term then multiple sets every time you train would probably not be the best choice. If you like to train hard and heavy then multiple sets are probably a better option for you but if your goal is more long term fitness (a mix of both muscle gain and fat loss) then multiple sets might be too time consuming to allow you to reach your goals.

Multiple sets of heavy lifting are also harder on your joints and can lead to injuries if not done properly. If you’re suffering from an injury or have had one in the past then multiple sets are probably not the best choice for you because of the increased stress that they’ll put on your body.

Multiple Set Training Program:

If your goal is to increase muscle mass over the long term (a few months or more) then I would choose a multiple set program.

Having the extra time to circulate the blood and burn more fat with cardiovascular training is a good thing if your goal is to decrease body fat over the long term. Also, since you’re doing more than one set for each muscle group you do not need to train each muscle group every single week in order to see results. This will give your joints a little bit of a break and will decrease your chance of getting injured since you have more time to let your body recover.

A good multiple set program to start with would be one that has you training five days per week, with two or three set per exercise and about ten to fifteen working reps per set. This type of program would fit in perfectly with the goals I just mentioned and is laid out nicely in the page on Building The Perfect Workout.

On this program you would train each muscle group twice per week and take the other three days off from working out. This would give your body plenty of time to circulate the blood and burn fat since you wouldn’t be working the same muscles two days in a row.

You can either train every day of the week or pick two days that you will always train on like Monday and Friday or Tuesday and Thursday. This gives you the same benefit of not training the same muscles two days in a row but gives you more flexibility in case something comes up and you can’t train on one of the days.

With this program you will have to train for about an hour total (twenty minutes per day) and that should fit into most people’s schedules. Make sure you’re properly warmed up and stretch and warm down after your workout.

If you want to decrease your time spent training then you can cut down to three days per week and train only one muscle group per day. For example, Monday would be legs, Tuesday would be chest and back, Thursday would be arms and shoulders, and Friday would be off. You can still do two or three sets per exercise but you may have to drop down to eight to twelve reps per set because of the increased workload.

If you want to increase your training time then you can add in a fourth day that would include abs, lower back, and any other smaller muscles that weren’t worked on the first three days. This would be a good day to experiment with some heavier sets of six to eight reps with these muscles because they will be getting a little more taxed from this training.

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Once again, make sure you’re warmed up properly before starting this program.

High Volume Training Program:

If your goal is to increase muscle size over the short term (a month or two) then I would choose a high volume program. This type of training will work well with your body type and give you some quick size.

You will be training each muscle group three times per week and you can either take the weekends off from training or do some light stretching/warm down on those days.

With this program you will be working each muscle group three times per week and you will not be doing any heavy lifting. The goal is to keep the weight around 60-70% of maximum on all sets. This may not seem very difficult, but the volume of work will allow you to still stimulate growth.

When doing the high rep sets your form on the concentric (lifting) phase should be slow and controlled in order to fully stretch the triceps. Other than that, there isn’t too much else to this program.

Again, make sure you are warmed up properly before starting this routine and stretch and warm down after your training.

Good Luck and Train Hard.

2nd Place – rev_dawg

The body is an amazing thing. One of the things that make it so amazing is the fact that there isn’t just one way to get results. Everyone’s body is different. Different genetics, different brains, different lifestyles, different nutrition, different training techniques…

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The list goes on and on.

While there are definitely ways of getting the same results, there isn’t one single way that will get the same results for everyone. This is where training splits come into play.

What Is A Training Split?

There are a few ways to define what a training split is since it can mean a few different things.

The most popular definition is a training split is the division of muscles that are concentrated on in a given day. So, for example: back and biceps would be a common split since back is normally worked on day one and then biceps is worked on day two.

However, for the sake of this article I’m going to use a slightly different definition and say that a training split is the division of workout focus in a given week or schedule. So, if you concentrated on just working chest for the entire week, that would be a chest focused training split. Or, if you worked legs every day for a week, that would also be considered a leg focused training split since the focus was purely on legs and not anything else.

Why Would I Use A Training Split?

There are many advantages to using different training splits. Probably the most popular reason to use a training split is that it allows you to concentrate on one or two particular parts of your body that you want to bring up without having those muscle groups interfere with the muscle groups that you are trying to bring up on another day.

For example, if you do chest on Monday, shoulders on Tuesday, and arms on Wednesday, you are going to hitting arms again on Wednesday. This would mean that your arms would have to rest for 5 days before getting worked again. So, in this particular case, your back and your calves are going to be getting more rest than the arms are.

However, if you change that schedule up a bit and concentrate on just one part of your body each day, you are allowing all of the muscles to rest for a day before being worked again. So, in this case you would do chest on Monday, shoulders on Tuesday, and then rest Wednesday. Then, Thursday would be arms and Friday would be chest, shoulders, and arms. This way your arms are getting more of a rest in-between training sessions.

There are other reasons for using a split as well. Some people just like the way they feel they respond to it better. Some people’s bodies recover better from it. Some people like the way they look better with certain splits.

The reasons go on and on.

How Should I Set Up My Own Training Split?

So, how do you set up your own training split?

Well, that’s a bit hard to answer mainly because it is different for everyone. The factors involved are numerous. Some include:

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Your current schedule (how busy you are, how much time you can train, etc…)

Your genetics (some people respond better to certain types of training than others)

Goals you are trying to achieve (do you want to put on more muscle, drop fat, etc…?)

And countless other factors.

What I can do however, is give you a few sample splits that people have found success with in the past and you can take it from there.

Here are some sample splits for you to choose from:

A Sample Training Split For The Drug-Free Trainer

This split is more oriented towards those that want to put on mass. It gives each muscle group a day of rest in between working it so that the muscles have a chance to grow.

Option 1: Back, Chest, shoulders, and arms on Monday.

Thursday: Legs, back, chest, and shoulders.

Option 2: Legs, back, chest, and shoulders on Monday.

Friday: Arms, legs, back, and chest.

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A Sample Training Split For The Person With Less Time Available To Train

This split is oriented more towards those that are trying to get cut as far away from the heavy lifting as possible. Therefore, the larger muscle groups are worked on each day in order to keep gains to a minimum while concentration is placed on the weaker body parts. This way, you won’t have a lagging muscle group bringing down the rest of your physique.

Option 1: Biceps, triceps, traps, and calves on Monday.

Thursday: Delts, abs, and upper back.

Option 2: Abs, upper back, and shoulders on Monday.

Friday: Biceps, triceps, and calves.

Option 3: Abs, chest, and tri’s on Monday.

Friday: Delts, traps, and upper back.

Option 4: Chest, abs, and tri’s on Monday.

Friday: Delts, upper back, and calves.

Option 5: Back, shoulders, and traps on Monday.

Friday: Biceps, abs, and calves.

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A Sample Training Split For The Person Who Is Trying To Get ‘Cut’

This split is oriented more towards those that are trying to get cut as opposed to bulking up or just maintaining size. It can be argued that it isn’t the best way to go about getting cut, but many people have gotten great results with this sort of set-up.

Option 1: Quads, hams, calves, and abs on Monday.

Thursday: Chest, shoulders, and tri’s.

Option 2: Chest, abs, and calves on Monday.

Friday: Quads, hams, and shoulders.

Option 3: Delts and traps on Monday.

Friday: Chest, tri’s, and abs.

Option 4: Quads, hams, and abs on Monday.

Friday: Delts, chest, and tri’s.

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Option 5: Delts and traps on Monday.

Friday: Quads, hams, and abs.

Option 6: Chest, tri’s, and calves on Monday.

Friday: Delts, abs, and quads.

Option 7: Back, biceps, and abs on Monday.

Thursday: Shoulders, chest, and tri’s.

Option 8: Shoulders, chest, and abs on Monday.

Friday: Back, biceps, and quads.

Option 9: Back, biceps, and tri’s on Monday.

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Friday: Shoulders, calves, and abs.

Option 10: Chest, tri’s, and hams on Monday.

Friday: Quads, delts, and abs.

Option 11: Chest, abs, and quads on Monday.

Friday: Back, hams, and delts.

Option 12: Chest, abs, and hams on Monday.

Friday: Back, quads, and tri’s.

Option 13: Back, tri’s, and abs on Monday.

Friday: Chest, hams, and delts.

Option 14: Quads, back, and abs on Monday.

Friday: Hams, chest, and tri’s.

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Option 15: Delts and traps on Monday.

Friday: Back, abs, and hams.

Option 16: Delts and traps on Monday.

Friday: Quads, abs, and chest.

Option 17: Delts and traps on Monday.

Friday: Back, hams, and quads.

Option 18: Back, biceps, and calves on Monday.

Thursday: Chest, abs, and delts.

Option 19: Back, biceps, and calves on Monday.

Friday: Chest, hams, and abs.

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Option 20: Chest, abs, and back on Monday.

Friday: Delts, hams, and quads.

Option 21: Delts and calves on Monday.

Thursday: Back, biceps, and abs.

Option 22: Delts and calves on Monday.

Friday: Back, quads, and abs.

Option 23: Chest, abs, and delts on Monday.

Friday: Back, hams, and tri’s.

Option 24: Chest, abs, and hams on Monday.

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Friday: Back, tri’s, and delts.

Option 25: Back, tri’s, and calves on Monday.

Thursday: Delts, chest, and abs.

Option 26: Back, tri’s, and abs on Monday.

Friday: Delts, quads, and hams.

Option 27: Back, abs, and calves on Monday.

Thursday: Quads, delts, and chest.

Option 28: Back, abs, and calves on Monday.

Friday: Delts, hams, and chest.

Option 29: Back, hams, and abs on Monday.

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Friday: Delts, calves, and tri’s.

Option 30: Delts and hams on Monday.

Thursday: Back, abs, and chest.

Option 31: Delts and hams on Monday.

Friday: Back, tri’s, and calves.

Option 32: Delts and calves on Monday.

Thursday: Back, abs, and quads.

Option 33: Delts and calves on Monday.

Friday: Back, hams, and abs.

Option 34: Chest, tri’s, and abs on Monday.

Friday: Delts, quads, and back.

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Option 35: Chest, tri’s, and abs on Monday.

Thursday: Delts, hams, and back.

Option 36: Chest, abs, and back on Monday.

Friday: Delts, quads, and tri’s.

Option 37: Chest, abs, and back on Monday.

Thursday: Quads, hams, and calves.

Option 38: Delts, chest, and abs on Monday.

Friday: Hams, delts, and tri’s.

Option 39: Delts, chest, and abs on Monday.

Friday: Quads, abs, and back.

Do You Need Multiple Sets, or Just One - Image

Option 40: Delts and calves on Monday.

Thursday: Quads, abs, and chest.

Option 41: Delts and hams on Monday.

Friday: Quads, delts, and back.

Option 42: Delts and hams on Monday.

Friday: Hams, abs, and chest.

Option 43: Back, abs, and chest on Monday.

Thursday: Back, abs, and hams.

Option 44: Back, abs, and chest on Monday.

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Friday: Hams, back, and quads.

Option 45: Hams, back, and chest on Monday.

Thursday: Quads, hams, and back.

Option 46: Quads, hams, and chest on Monday.

Friday: Delts and calves.

Option 47: Delts and calves on Monday.

Thursday: Delts, chest, and back.

Option 48: Delts and calves on Monday.

Friday: Delts, abs, and hams.

Option 49: Delts and calves on Monday.

Thursday: Quads, abs, and hams.

Option 50: Delts and calves on Monday.

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Friday: Hams, delts, and abs.

Option 51: Hams, abs, and chest on Monday.

Thursday: Hams, abs, and back.

Option 52: Hams, abs, and chest on Monday.

Friday: Delts and quads.

Option 53: Delts and calves on Monday.

Thursday: Delts, tri’s, and abs.

Option 54: Delts and calves on Monday.

Friday: Delts, hams, and tri’s.

Do You Need Multiple Sets, or Just One - Image

Option 55: Delts and abs on Monday.

Thursday: Delts and chest.

Option 56: Delts and abs on Monday.

Friday: Delts and hams.

Option 57: Delts and abs on Monday.

Thursday: Abs, hams, and chest.

Option 58: Quads, hams, and abs on Tuesday.

Thursday: Hams, chest, and abs.

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Option 59: Delts and hams on Tuesday.

Thursday: Delts, back, and abs.

Option 60: Delts, calves, and abs on Tuesday.

Thursday: Quads, hams, and abs.

After you’ve created your routine, write it in the workout log here: _________

Section 5: Nutrition.

This section is for those of you who are serious about your nutrition. I will go over some tips to maximize your results.

Protein Intake: This is one of the most commonly talked about subjects.

How much do you need?

The general rule of thumb is 1-1.5 grams per pound of body weight. I personally go with the higher end, 1.5. Many people will say you need more than this because you’re exercising. While this is true, if you’re going to eat that much protein, you’d have to eat inhuman amounts of food, which we’ll discuss in the next section.

Common Questions:

How should I consume my protein?

Your protein sources should be spread out throughout the day. Take me for example. I have four meals consisting of protein each day.

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Meal 1: 8 egg whites, 2 eggs, 1 cup of Oatmeal

Meal 2: 6oz chicken, 4 cups of mixed veggies

Meal 3 (Pre workout): 1 scoop of Whey protein, 1 cup of Fruit

Meal 4 (Post Workout): 2 scoops of Whey protein, 2 cups of Rice Cakes

Meal 5: 8oz Steak, 2 cups of Broccoli

This sums up to: 5 whole eggs, 6oz chicken, 6oz Steak, 2 scoops of protein, and 3 cups of oatmeal throughout the day. This totals to roughly 1.5 grams per lb of body weight. As for the time frame, you can do it in between your meals.

Just make sure you have your 4 main meals within a time frame.

I’ve heard people say not to eat fruit with proteins or carbs with proteins because they negate each other.

Is this true?

No. this is a long-standing myth that has long since been debunked through rigorous studies. In fact, studies have shown that eating proteins with carbohydrates speeds the absorption rate of the carbs into your system.

Which form of Whey do you recommend?

This is a hard question to answer simply because there are so many different types out on the market. I would personally stay clear of any flavored whey proteins.

Why?

Because most of them (with the exception of Naturally Flavored brands) are made from whey concentrates and flavoring.

Why is this not good?

Concentrates are very heavily processed and have fillers in them. Also, because it’s FLAVORED, they have added sugars. For these reasons, I would personally stay away from these. Whey Isolates should be fine as long as you watch your calorie intake because it has less calories. Hydrolysates are the fastest form of protein you can take. The downside is that it’s extracted through the use of acid, so it’s almost like taking a protein pill.

The only Whey I would trust is 100% Whey or Pure Protein brand because they’re produced by reputable companies with good quality control. I would avoid anything by EAS and Muscle Tech.

Can I take extra BCAAs or glutamine?

Yes, but don’t go overboard. 5g of BCAAs pre and post workout is more than enough for most people. Glutamine is fine to take after workouts. I personally don’t use it because I get enough from food. You may want to look into tablets that contain both, such as Scivation Xtend.

What type of carbohydrates do you recommend?

This is a loaded question. There are so many different types of carbohydrates out there and it really depends on your diet. If you’re trying to gain mass, you should base most of your carbs on starchy foods. You can get away with eating a lot more starchy carbs than non-starchy ones. If you want to lose fat or gain less mass, you can eat a lot more non-starchy carbs while staying fairly lean. Personally, I eat a lot of both. Here’s a list of good carbs to eat: Sweet Potatoes, Yams, Beets, Pasta (whole grain only), Brown Rice, Oatmeal, and of course, fruits and veggies. These are all good sources of carbohydrates. There are so many more, but these are all readily available and cheap as well.

Why do you recommend mainly barbell exercises?

There are three reasons for this.

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They’re more sports-specific: Most of what people do in daily life doesn’t really involve a lot of isolation moves. If you want to get stronger in something, you need to train the entire body rather than one or two small parts of it. For example, doing leg extensions won’t make your legs stronger than doing Squats or Leg Presses.

More efficient: There’s much more musculature involved in Barbell exercises than isolation exercises. For example, in the Pull-Up, not only are you working your back, but you’re also working your arms, shoulders and even your core to stabilize yourself. Barbells allow you to move more weight than Dumbbells and for many people is more comfortable as well.

I’m not a fan of machines: Most of them don’t mimic the movements that we do in real life and can lead to injuries if used often. For example, the leg extension is a common exercise to build your quadriceps. While it does do that, it doesn’t do much more than that because it doesn’t require any stabilization from other parts of your body. Real life situations require you to balance yourself.

If you were to lose your balance while doing this exercise, you could easily fall and get hurt.

What’s your stance on cardio?

I’m going to give you the same answer that I give to everybody: It’s depends.

If you’re a complete beginner, doing too much cardio is going to decrease your gains in strength and muscle size. You need to master the basics first. After a year or so, then you can start focusing on things like running for 15 minutes.

If you’re more experienced and are looking to lose a lot of fat, then cardio can be useful. It will help burn off the layer directly above the muscle (subcutaneous) and also your body fat in general.

If you’re more experienced and are trying to gain muscle or strength, then I don’t recommend doing much cardio. As I’ve said many times in this article, strength training is what’s going to increase your muscle size and endurance, not cardio. If you really want to lose fat, then do HIIT (High-Intensity Interval Training). This has been proven to be much more effective than regular cardio and takes much less time.

Do you recommend supplements?

As a bodybuilder, most of your gains are going to come from proper eating and weightlifting. Supplements can help accelerate your results, but only if you know what you’re doing. I’ve experimented with various supplements over the years and I’ll tell you what has and hasn’t worked.

Pre-Workout: None! Seriously, most of these contain banned substances that are probably worse than anything you’d find on the street. Your energy should come from your motivation to succeed and the joy you get from making yourself better. If you need to take something, then drink some coffee or an energy drink.

Also, check out Muscle Explosion. It’s much cheaper than other pre-workouts and it’s all natural.

Creatine: The most researched supplement out there. It’s safe and highly effective. It’s pretty much essential for anybody that’s seriously into strength training.

Whey Protein: Another supplement that’s highly researched and very effective. I can’t tell you how much money I’ve saved by making my own protein drinks rather than buying them at the store. Plus, you can make pretty much any kind you want.

ZMA: This is a combo of Zinc, Magnesium and Vitamin B that’s been known to increase testosterone levels and increase the quality of your sleep. Pretty much essential for anybody serious about gaining muscle or losing fat.

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Fish Oil: These have been proven to be extremely healthy for you. They help reduce the risk of heart disease and many other things. They’re also an effective way of reducing inflammation caused by intense training. Inflammation is both a barrier to gains and the cause of much pain.

GH Release: You know how Zinc, Magnesium, Vitamin B and Fish Oil all help release more Growth Hormone?

Well this is a highly concentrated form of those mixed together. It’s expensive, but it’s the best money can buy.

Fat Burner: These are pretty much the opposite of what you should be taking. They’re expensive, and they don’t work. If you want to accelerate your fat loss, then try HIIT (High-Intensity Interval Training). It’s much healthier and more effective.

Weight Gainer: Want to gain weight?

Eat more! These are pretty much completely useless and a waste of money.

So there you have it, the secrets to gaining muscle, and losing fat. I promise, if follow this correctly, you will get the body of your dreams. Nothing is impossible! Good luck.

FAQ’s:

Q: I don’t have a lot of money, can I still follow this guide?

A: Yes, you just have to be resourceful. Don’t buy things like Creatine Monohydrate, ZMA or Whey Protein, make them yourself. Also, eat foods that are cheap and healthy. Don’t go out to eat, cook your own food. There are ways to still reach your goals without blowing your entire paycheck.

Q: I can’t gain weight no matter what I do, even with eating a lot. I’ve even tried gaining weight foods and it doesn’t work.

Is there anything I can do?

A: Some people have a really hard time gaining weight, especially skinny guys. Truth be told, you’re probably just one of those people who will have a really hard time putting on muscle, and that’s fine. You can still lose fat and get in shape. I’m actually one of those people who has a hard time gaining weight, and that’s why I have a six pack, and all my friends who can eat anything they want and not gain a pound, don’t.

Q: What do you listen to when you work out?

A: It varies. I like electronic music, but I also like old school rap (think Wu-Tang Clan). I also like listening to pop music on occasion. I’ve even been know to throw on some classic rock. I try not to listen to lyrics, because I find that they distract me from my own thoughts while working out. It’s all a matter of personal preference.

Q: What does your diet look like?

A: My diet is really simple. I pretty much eat the same thing everyday, with the exception of weekends. Here’s a typical day for me:

Breakfast: 4 whole eggs, oatmeal, 1 serving of fruit (either a peach or an apple).

Morning Snack: Bowl of ice cream (I don’t know how this fits into a healthy diet, but I’m not going to lie to you. I love ice cream, and I work out a lot, so it doesn’t do that much harm in the scheme of things and it makes me happy. It also tends to put me in a great mood!)

Lunch: I’m either eating leftovers or taking a packed lunch. If I am taking a packed lunch, it’s usually some form of meat (like chicken), and vegetables.

Afternoon Snack: Same as Morning Snack.

Dinner: See Lunch.

Before Bed: I’m usually too full from dinner to eat anything at night, but if I am hungry I’ll have a bowl of fruit or some peanut butter on wheat bread (I know, weird).

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Q: That diet looks horrible!

How can you live like that?

Surely you get fat just looking at all that food.

A: Actually, my diet is really healthy and balanced.

Sources & references used in this article:

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