Drilling the Basics for BJJ Success

Drilling the Basics for BJJ Success:

BJJ is one of the most popular martial arts. There are many reasons why it’s so popular.

One of them is its simplicity. You don’t need a lot of equipment or money to start training. Another reason is that it requires little time and effort from your part, which makes it very accessible to everyone regardless of their level of experience or ability.

The other main reason is the fact that it’s not really difficult at all. If you’re a beginner, then you probably won’t have any problems with it.

However, if you’ve been training for awhile and want to improve your skills further, then there are some things that will make your life easier.

If you’re new to the sport, then you might think that drilling is something that would only benefit advanced students.

But what happens when someone starts out and doesn’t have much experience?

They’ll still get better results by doing drills than they will by trying to learn everything on their own.

So how do you drill without spending too much time?

Here are a few tips:

1) Drill the basics first!

If your instructor is making you do a lot of repetition drills, then you probably don’t need us to tell you to do them! However, in most cases people skip the basics and jump straight into more complex techniques.

Drilling the Basics for BJJ Success - gym fit workout

While this can sometimes work for some people, it’s not usually a good idea.

Before you learn a flashy new submission, you should make sure that you have the basics of each position and move down. If you can’t maneuver in a position or fall back on a basic, then the flashy stuff isn’t going to do you much good.

2) Drill positions before you drill moves!

In the same way that you need to learn the basics of each position before you combine them, you also need to drill the positions themselves well before you start mixing things up. If your basics are weak, then everything else is going to fall apart around that.

In order to get the most out of your drilling time, you should pick one position and drill it in various scenarios. For example, let’s say that you choose the closed guard.

You would start off by just doing the motions for the closed guard. Move into your partner a bit and put your feet in his hip. Lift your hips and put your knees on his upper arms. Then, without getting off of his arms, lift one leg up to the side to simulate the sweep.

Do that a few times to get comfortable with it, then add the next part. Still in the same position, lift one leg up and try to hook your foot behind your partner’s knee.

Then, perform the drill again. Lastly, try to finish the movement by performing a sweep.

Sources & references used in this article:

Workouts for MMA Fighters, BJJ, Boxing, Wrestling and other Combat Sports by C Beasley – fightcampconditioning.com

Workouts for MMA Fighters, BJJ, Boxing, Wrestling and other Combat Sports by G Chiu – fightcampconditioning.com

Workouts for MMA Fighters, BJJ, Boxing, Wrestling and other Combat Sports by J James – fightcampconditioning.com

Workouts for MMA Fighters, BJJ, Boxing, Wrestling and other Combat Sports by W Wayland – fightcampconditioning.com

Evidence-based guidelines for strength and conditioning in mixed martial arts by C Tack – Strength & Conditioning Journal, 2013 – journals.lww.com

Comparison between external fixation and sliding hip screw in the management of trochanteric fracture of the femur in Nepal by NK Karn, GK Singh, P Kumar… – The Journal of …, 2006 – online.boneandjoint.org.uk

Find the Martial Art That Makes You Fit by B Potter, M Steedly