Endurance Training Essentials: Strength, Intervals, and Aerobics

Exercise Physiology – Aerobic Capacity Interval Training

The first thing to note about aerobic capacity intervals is that they are not just any type of interval training. They are different from traditional interval training because they involve continuous high intensity work at low to moderate intensities for extended periods of time (i.e., longer than 30 seconds). These types of intervals have been used in many sports, including track cycling, running, rowing, swimming and weightlifting.

Aerobic capacity intervals are often referred to as “high intensity” or “maximal effort” intervals because they require maximal strength and power output during the exercise. However, these types of intervals do not necessarily need to result in maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 max) values. VO2 max refers to your body’s ability to use oxygen efficiently while exercising at a given workload. If you are able to maintain a certain level of VO2 max throughout the duration of an exercise session, then it does not necessarily mean that you are using all your muscles effectively. A higher VO2 max may indicate that your body is utilizing other muscle groups to perform some of the work required for completing the exercise.

For example, high intensity interval training in rowing involves the combination of 6-10 seconds of “all out” sprinting and 50-60 seconds of moderate rowing. The goal is to complete as many rounds (or intervals) as possible within a given period of time. These types of intervals can be applied to any sport or activity that requires short bursts of speed and power, in addition to extended periods of steady state exercise. There are many types of interval training for endurance, and these are just a few examples of how they can be effectively incorporated into your training program.

Interval training involves alternating between moderate intensity and high intensity exercise. This type of training is extremely effective for improving your cardiovascular and respiratory systems, as well as your muscular system. The most common types of interval training involve exercising (or working) at either low or high levels of intensity.

Low intensity interval training: This type of training is also known as aerobic or zone training. Activities at this level of intensity require prolonged aerobic energy production and involve prolonged periods of 12-20 heart beats per minute. This type of training can be performed for a longer duration than high intensity intervals and still provide the same health benefits.

High intensity interval training: This type of training is also known as anaerobic or sprint training. Activities at this level of intensity require short bursts of speed and power, and may involve the use of anaerobic energy systems. Depending on the type of activity, this may require a shorter or longer duration than low intensity intervals.

Endurance Running Training

One of the most common forms of aerobic training for endurance running is fartlek training. Fartlek training involves running at various speeds throughout your run rather than running at a steady pace. For example, if you’re running for 30 minutes you may run at a fast pace for 5 minutes and then slow down to a brisk walk or jog for a few minutes before picking up the pace again. Fartlek training helps simulate the endurance demands that you may experience during a race, as well as helping to keep your body from adapting to a routine and therefore reducing your endurance capabilities.

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Another form of aerobic training for endurance running is interval training. Interval training for running involves high intensity exercise mixed with low intensity exercise. Studies have shown that interval training can increase running endurance more effectively than steady state exercise, particularly among those who do not normally engage in vigorous physical activity. Interval training can be done either by intervals of lower intensity followed by intervals of higher intensity (i.e.

a 5:1 work to rest ratio), or by intervals of higher intensity with a shorter rest (i.e. a 1:2 work to rest ratio).

Rowing Training

One of the best ways to train for endurance for rowing is to incorporate various rowing machine workouts into your training routine. These workouts can be broken up into two main types, long slow distance training and high intensity interval training.

Long slow distance training (LSD), also known as base building, is used to increase endurance and general physical preparedness. This type of training involves exercising for a longer duration at a low intensity level in order to build up your aerobic energy production. For rowing, this may involve warm up, followed by steady pace interval for 20-40 minutes, followed by a cool down.

High intensity interval training, also known as sprint training, is used to increase your anaerobic endurance energy, as well as your general physical preparedness. This type of training involves exercising for shorter intervals at a higher intensity in order to build up your anaerobic energy production capabilities. For rowing, this may involve a warm up followed by repeated intervals of all out effort for 20-40 seconds, followed by a cool down.

Stamina Training

It’s important to remember that during a sprint race your muscles rely mainly on anaerobic energy production, while during a longer distance race your muscles rely mainly on aerobic energy production. By training for both distances on the same day, you’ll be able to increase your physical preparedness for any type of race. For example, if you choose to do sprint and distance training on the same day, your sprint training would involve running an all out 200m effort, followed by a slow jog to recover for half the amount of time it took you to complete the interval, followed by another all out 200m effort. This is a form of interval training. Alternatively, you could do a warm up, followed by 8-12 all out 200m efforts, followed by a slow jog to recover for the same amount of time it took you to complete the interval, followed by another all out 200m effort.

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This is another form of interval training. You can of course design your own sprint training routine.

Tips for Rowing Training

Sample Rowing Workouts

Rowing is a great way to get in shape and stay in shape. Not only does it provide a full body workout, but it’s an excellent cardio vascular exercise that has been proven to increase your endurance and stamina. It also provides some flexibility training for those with tight hamstrings and lower back as it encourages proper stretching after your workouts.

For those just starting out in rowing, it’s a good idea to hook yourself up to a machine and have a trainer show you the proper technique. This will not only ensure safe workouts for years to come, but it will also allow you to get the most out of your rowing workouts.

After you’ve gotten the hang of the proper rowing form, you’ll have to decide how you want to train. There are two main types of training techniques that are used in rowing, interval training and stamina training.

Interval training is used to increase your overall speed during races. It involves rowing at a fast pace for a set period of time, followed by a set period of lower pace recovery. An example would be to have you row at full speed for 60 seconds, and then recover at a slow pace for 90 seconds. As your fitness improves you can decrease your rest periods and increase your work periods.

Stamina training is used to increase your overall endurance during races. It involves continuous rowing at a medium pace for a set period of time. An example would be to have you row at a fast pace for 30 minutes. As your fitness improves you can increase the length of your workouts.

As with all workouts, it’s important that you warm up properly and stretch after each session as static stretching will help prevent soreness and prolong the life span of your muscles.

Marathon Training

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Here is how you can run a full marathon, and even more!

First, sign up for a race. There are many marathons that you can run in. Pick one that is at a reasonable time and place. The best would be one that is near your home or work. If not, travel arrangements might get tough.

So, pick a nearby one.

Now, train for it! You must prepare your body for the torture you are going to put it through. A few months of 3-6 hours of running a week should get you in good shape. However, do not run more than 6 hours a week non-stop or you will burn yourself out and hurt yourself. Instead, take walk breaks or run less.

You must also stretch before and after every training session and race. This is very important as it prevents injury which can end your career as a runner.

Another really important thing is diet. Now, I’m not talking about eating carrots and cornbread. I’m saying that you must have the right drinks. You should take in a lot of carbs the day before and the day of the race. A good drink the day before would be fruit juices and gels(if you want).

The morning of the race, you should eat bread or bagels with jelly or can have a energy bar.

Sources & references used in this article:

Maximal strength, power, and aerobic endurance adaptations to concurrent strength and sprint interval training by GS Cantrell, BK Schilling, MR Paquette… – European journal of …, 2014 – Springer

Effect of preseason concurrent muscular strength and high-intensity interval training in professional soccer players by P Wong, A Chaouachi, K Chamari… – … Journal of Strength & …, 2010 – journals.lww.com

Caloric expenditure of aerobic, resistance, or combined high-intensity interval training using a hydraulic resistance system in healthy men by PH Falcone, CY Tai, LR Carson, JM Joy… – … Journal of Strength & …, 2015 – journals.lww.com

Multimodal high-intensity interval training increases muscle function and metabolic performance in females by S Buckley, K Knapp, A Lackie, C Lewry… – Applied Physiology …, 2015 – NRC Research Press

Effects of β-alanine supplementation and high-intensity interval training on endurance performance and body composition in men; a double-blind trial by AE Smith, AA Walter, JL Graef, KL Kendall… – Journal of the …, 2009 – Springer

Effects of exercise modality during additional “high-intensity interval training” on aerobic fitness and strength in powerlifting and strongman athletes by P Androulakis-Korakakis, L Langdown… – … Journal of Strength & …, 2018 – journals.lww.com

Effects of concurrent exercise protocols on strength, aerobic power, flexibility and body composition by H Arazi, H Faraji, MG Moghadam… – … : International journal of …, 2011 – hrcak.srce.hr

The acute influence of two intensities of aerobic exercise on strength training performance in elderly women by A Lemos, R Simão, M Polito, B Salles… – … Journal of Strength …, 2009 – cdn.journals.lww.com

Comparing aerobic adaptations with a running based high intensity interval training (HIIT) and a continuous endurance training (CET) protocol in relatively healthy … by EJ Sanchez – 2013 – dc.ewu.edu