How to Adjust Sets and Reps to Fit Your Training Goal

The number of sets and reps depends on your goal. You need to determine the number of sets and reps according to your goals. If you want to increase muscle mass, then it’s better if you have fewer sets than more repetitions. On the other hand, if you are trying to lose fat or get leaner, then it would be best if you had more repetitions than less.

How Many Sets And Repetitions Should I Do For Muscle Growth?

For building muscle, it’s better to perform fewer sets than more repetitions. The reason why is because the body needs time to adapt and grow bigger muscles. So, if you train with low repetition, high frequency (LRRTHF) method, your body will be able to gain size faster than if you train with higher repetition, lower frequency (LRHTF).

You can use the following table to figure out how many sets and reps you should do:

Repetition Frequency (RnFr/hr) Set 1 Set 2 Set 3 Set 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 9 10 10 10 10 10 11 11 11 11 11 12 12 12 12 12 13 13 13 13 13 14 14 14 14 14 15 15 15 15 15 16 16 16 16 16 17 17 17 17 17 18 18 18 18 18 19 19 19 19 19 20 20 20 20 20 21 21 21 21 21 21 22 22 22 22 22 23 23 23 23 23 24 24 24 24 24 25 25 25 25 25 26 26 26 26 26 27 27 27 27 27 28 28 28 28 28 29 29 29 29 29 30 30 30 30 30 31 31 31 31 31 32 32 32 32 32 33 33 33 33 33 34 34 34 34 34 35 35 35 35 35 36 36 36 36 36 37 37 37 37 37 38 38 38 38 38 39 39 39 39 39 40 40 40 40 40 41 41 41 41 41 42 42 42 42 42

This table shows the number of sets and reps you should do under each repetition frequency.

When you go up to 100 repetitions, you can do nearly an unlimited number of sets, though it is not recommended. Instead, you should stick to lower numbers of sets like one or two sets.

If you are a beginner, do about 3 sets of 10-15 reps, if you are an intermediate lifter, do about 4-5 sets of 6-10 reps and if you are advanced lifters, you should be doing about 5-7 sets of 4-8 reps to failure.

A beginner would be someone who has never worked out or in some other way been active in their life. An intermediate lifter would be someone who has been training consistently for around 1-2 years and an advanced lifter is someone who has been training for over 2 years.

How many sets and reps should I do to lose fat?

For fat loss, it’s better if you have more sets than less repetitions. The reason why is that you need to keep your muscles guessing by constantly changing the weight, reps and sets. If you continue to train with low sets and high repetitions, your body will get used to it and it won’t be as effective.

For fat loss, the best method is to do 8-12 sets of 5-15 reps. You could also try just doing 1-3 sets of 20-30 reps.

This will train your muscles while burning fat and will get your body used to changing the weight, reps and sets on a regular basis. This way, you’ll stay leaner, look harder and be able to keep your muscles guessing.

What About Usui’s Muscle Memory Theory?

In the beginning of this guide I mentioned that Master Ueshiba (the founder of Aikido) didn’t actually have a formal martial arts training. Even though he was much older than other members, he started training with the help of one of his students and quickly surpassed everyone. This is an example that shows us that you can achieve great skill even if you are out of shape or whatever other excuse we may come up with.

When we quit working out, it isn’t like everything is gone and we have to start from scratch again. We may lose some strength, but it isn’t like we forget everything.

It usually just takes a while to get back in shape and it isn’t something that happens over night.

How to Adjust Sets and Reps to Fit Your Training Goal - gym fit workout

Our muscles don’t disappear when we stop working out and this so called “muscle memory” is more of a psychological effect than anything else.

Sources & references used in this article:

Strength Basics: Your guide to resistance training for health and optimal performance by BB Cook, GW Stewart – 1996 – books.google.com

Kettlebell training by S Cotter – 2013 – books.google.com

Weight training: steps to success by TR Baechle, RW Earle – 2019 – books.google.com

The Definitive Guide to Autoregulated Training by A Legge – completehumanperformance.com

… size gains, intensity of effort is the most important by far. Your results from training have more to do with how hard you train than how much training you do or … by D Baye – baye.com

How To Get Your Gains Back After A Training Break By Jordan Rhodes May 29, 2020 One Comment by N Plans, RG Gear – jeffnippard.com

Those who are successful at fat loss know their body well and how it responds to nutrition and training. Here is an in-depth fat loss guide to help you lose fat … by R Chee – bodybuilding.com