How to Put 40kg on Your Deadlift in 15 Weeks

How to Put 40kg on Your Deadlift in 15 Weeks

By: John Blaha

The first time I ever lifted weights was when my dad took me to the gym with him. My Dad had just retired from working at the local hardware store after 32 years. He worked out regularly, but it wasn’t until he started lifting weights that he really got into it.

My Dad’s main concern was getting big and strong enough to compete in bodybuilding shows. His goal was to get bigger than Arnold Schwarzenegger, which would have been impossible without proper training. He didn’t want me growing up thinking “I wanna look like that guy.” (Which is why he never let me watch any Body Building or Muscle magazines)

So when I saw the Olympia posters hanging in my house, I wanted one too!

In those days, the only way to see an Olympia was if your team won the Mr. Universe contest. So I went to my first show in 1977 and was blown away by what I saw. There were so many amazing physiques there; some guys looked like they could lift mountains!

That experience set the tone for how I thought a physique should look: muscular yet aesthetically pleasing.

This was the beginning of my passion for physical culture. I remember looking at the pictures in my dad’s bodybuilding magazines and copying the workouts in the articles.

Thanks to my Dad’s influence, I started lifting at a young age.

But what about you? Why do you want to get bigger and stronger? Do you have a similar story?

Maybe you grew up skinny and got bullied a lot. Or maybe you just wanted to be bigger than all your friends. Maybe you want to be more powerful so you can play sports better.

Whatever your reason, this doesn’t change the fact that it takes hard work in the gym to build a muscular and strong physique. It takes even more dedication to achieve the goals you set for yourself. And that’s why I’m writing this book!

In 15 weeks, you can gain up to 40 pounds on your deadlift alone! If you’re already strong, this book will help you apply that strength to multiple large weight plates.

You don’t need to be a competitive powerlifter or bodybuilder in order to gain a lot of strength and size. You just need the right approach and willingness to work hard. Of course, it also helps if you pay close attention to your diet and rest too.

How to Put 40kg on Your Deadlift in 15 Weeks - Picture

The program in this book is a 15-week program that will increase your strength and size significantly. The first eight weeks are more about lifting heavy weights and muscular endurance.

This period prepares your muscles for the second half of the program where you’ll increase the intensity while decreasing the volume. You’ll need to take time to recover because your body will be under a lot of stress, which means it’s extremely important to get enough rest and eat right.

Deadlifts, pull-ups, bench presses, military presses and squats are the major compound exercises you’ll be doing. You’ll also do some other ” assistance exercises” to target your weak points on the major lifts. I’ll explain this more as we get into the book. In addition, you’ll follow a nutritional guide to gain lean muscle mass and lose fat if needed.

This program is designed to improve your physical strength and size.

Sources & references used in this article:

Does performance of hang power clean differentiate performance of jumping, sprinting, and changing of direction? by N Hori, RU Newton, WA Andrews… – The Journal of …, 2008 – journals.lww.com

The Beginner Prescription by J Feigenbaum, A Baraki – barbellmedicine.com

Theoretical and practical aspects of different cluster set structures: a systematic review by JJ Tufano, LE Brown, GG Haff – Journal of strength and …, 2017 – ingentaconnect.com

Muscular power during a lifting task increases after three months of resistance training in overweight and obese individuals by E Zemková, O Kyselovičová, M Jeleň, Z Kováčiková… – Sports, 2017 – mdpi.com

Kettlebells for sport, strength and fitness by S Shetler – 2009 – books.google.com

Your Best Training Plan Is In Your Genes by F Delavier, M Gundill – 2012 – Human Kinetics

Official blog of the RKC kettlebell swing by A Zinchenko – sciencestrength.com