Kids Who Lift Weights Are Better at Soccer

Kids Who Lift Weights Are Better at Soccer

The kids are always lifting weights. They want to look like Arnold Schwarzenegger and they don’t care what their body looks like after they’ve put on some muscle mass.

But there’s one thing that bothers me most about these kids: Their strength level is way too low!

I mean, do you think Arnold would have been able to pull off such amazing feats without the use of heavy weights? If not, then why do these kids need to start using them now?

I’m sure you’re wondering how I came up with this idea. Well, it all started when my friend Mikey (who is a competitive powerlifter) told me that he was going to be competing in a local competition soon. His goal was to get as many reps as possible while wearing only boxers and no shirt. After he had completed his routine, he went home and did squats and deadlifts. I asked him if he used any weights other than barbells or dumbbells. He replied that he didn’t use anything else because he wanted to show everyone how much better his form was compared to those kids who were lifting weights without proper technique.

When I heard this story, I couldn’t believe it!

Did he not know that you could build mass and strength without the use of heavy weights?

The answer is obviously no. And this is coming from a guy who’s been powerlifting for over two years now. So, I want to use this opportunity to tell other kids (and adults too) that there’s more than one way to build muscle and gain strength. In fact, you don’t even need to go to the gym at all if you want to succeed.

So, if you want build some serious muscle and gain tremendous strength, then keep on reading. I’m going to show you how everyday objects can make you huge and strong!

Before We Begin

I think it’s important that you know how to perform each exercise correctly before we start. If you don’t know how to do them, then you won’t get the best results.

So, here is a link to a guide that will show you how to perform every exercise listed in this article.

The Exercises

1. Face Pulls

The face pull is an excellent exercise for building up your posterior head (the back of your shoulders). This area is prone to injuries among weightlifters, so it’s very important that we strengthen this area with specific exercises.

If you don’t reinforce this area, then you’re putting yourself at risk for injuries during your workouts and sporting events.

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2. Bulgarian Bag Swings

Bulgarian bag swings are a great way to build up your hips and thighs. Most professional weightlifters use the swinging movement when they deadlift or clean and jerk so it’s very important that we do them too in order to stay safe and injury-free while lifting.

3. Lateral Raises

Lateral raises are a great exercise for building up your medial deltoid (the top portion of your shoulders). This area tends to be weaker than the posterior head (the back of your shoulders) which can lead to injury.

By performing lateral raises, you’ll be able to strengthen your medial deltoids and help prevent injuries.

4. Glute-Ham Raises

Glute-Ham raises are excellent for building up your hamstrings and glutes. These muscles are some of the strongest muscles in your body and should not be neglected.

By working them hard, you’ll be able to jump higher, run faster, and lift heavier weights.

5. Hindu Pushups

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Hindu pushups are great for strengthening your chest, shoulders, and triceps. They work many of the same muscles that the bench press works, which makes it a very effective exercise.

However, most people today are too weak to do them properly so it’s important that you follow the guide to ensure proper form.

6. Pullups and Chinups

There is a big difference between the chinup and pullup. For this reason, I’ve included both exercises in this list.

Chinups focus on your biceps while pullups focus on your back. Between the two, I’d recommend doing both (in fact, I do about 5 sets of 5 reps of each exercise). If you’re unable to do any variations of these exercises, then I’d recommend that you can use resistance bands to help you complete the movements.

Remember, Stronger Muscles Prevent Injuries

As you can see, there are many different exercises that will make you successful in becoming a weightlifting champion. However, it’s very important that you maintain proper form and technique when working out.

If you don’t, then you could get injured.

Most importantly, remember that the key to bodybuilding is to make sure your muscles are getting stronger over time. When you begin, you may not be able to do one chinup.

But, as you work at it a bit (with proper form), you’ll be able to do several without any problems. As you get stronger, your muscles will get bigger and better defined.

If you want some professional guidance with your exercises and the best way to train, then I’d recommend that you find a good personal trainer. A good personal trainer can show you how to use proper form and instruct you on the best training techniques.

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Many gyms offer personal training so if you’re serious about this, I’d start looking into it. Good Luck and have fun!

Sources & references used in this article:

Influence of virtual reality soccer game on walking performance in robotic assisted gait training for children by K Brütsch, T Schuler, A Koenig, L Zimmerli… – … of neuroengineering and …, 2010 – Springer

Strength performance in youth: trainability of adolescents and children in the back and front squats by M Keiner, A Sander, K Wirth, O Caruso… – The Journal of …, 2013 – cdn.journals.lww.com

The Effect of the Core Exercises on Body Composition, Selected Strength and Performance Skills in Child Soccer Players by H Genç, AE Ciğerci – International Journal of Applied Exercise …, 2020 – researchgate.net

Effects of resistance training on the physical capacities of adolescent soccer players by M Christou, I Smilios, K Sotiropoulos… – The Journal of …, 2006 – academia.edu