Lateral Training for Athleticism and Injury Prevention

Lateral Movement Exercises for Athleticism and Injury Prevention

The following are some of the most popular lateral movement exercises:

1) Side Step with Leg Lift (SLLL):

This exercise involves raising your right leg up while keeping it straight. You then step forward with your left foot until you reach a 90 degree angle between them. Then you lift both legs up so they’re parallel to the floor again before stepping back down. Repeat this motion several times.

2) Plank with Knees Up (PLK):

You stand facing each other holding hands and place your feet together. Your knees will be bent at a 45 degree angle. Keep your head up and keep breathing normally throughout the whole exercise. Hold for 10 seconds, relax for 5 seconds, repeat 10 times.

3) One Arm Row (ORA):

Stand with one arm outstretched and your elbow bent. Keeping your shoulder blades pressed against the ground, pull yourself up until you feel resistance from your upper back. Lower yourself slowly back down to start over. Do not allow any pain or discomfort during this exercise.

Lateral Training for Athleticism and Injury Prevention - GYM FIT WORKOUT

Repeat 3 times with a rest period of 1 minute between sets. Rest 30 seconds after each set of 10 reps, resting for 2 minutes between sets.

Lateral Training Machine for Athleticism and Injury Prevention

The following are some of the most popular Lateral Training Machines:

1) Kettler Axion Lateral Trainer:

The Kettler Axion Lateral Trainer uses a manual motion of moving your arms in an arc from side to side to strengthen muscles. This machine can be used by people with physical problems such as limited mobility or for someone who is trying to enhance performance. This machine is safe to use because it has a padded seat and padded handgrips.

2) Power Systems Mini-Bike:

The Power Systems Mini-Bike is a portable machine for your home. It uses your body weight to strengthen the muscles in the upper body. The motion of the arm in an arc from side to side causes your hips to move back and forth, strengthening the lower body as well.

3) The Skierg:

The Skierg is used for cross-country training and helps to increase the speed of your legs. It uses the body’s natural pendulum motion combined with resistance. Used primarily for advanced cross-country skiers, this machine can help improve strength, increase endurance, and prevent injury.

Lateral Exercise for Athletes

Lateral Training for Athleticism and Injury Prevention - Picture

One of the most popular types of exercise for athletes is the side step. The side step is done by stepping to the side while at the same time bringing one leg forward and one leg back. It is a simple exercise to do and it strengthens the muscles around the knee joint. This type of exercise is popular among sports such as football, soccer, and rugby where quick stops and starts are important.

It is also important for speed skaters to do in order to strengthen their ankles and their legs. For a more difficult version of this exercise you can add ankle weights.

Lateral Training with Resistance Band

The following are some of the most popular Lateral Training with Resistance Band Exercises:

1) Side Lunge with Rotation:

Stand on the middle of the resistance band and hold each end in the hand at your sides. Lunge sideways with your right leg. As your foot touches the floor, rotate your arms in a large arc, moving them from the side to the front of your body and back several times.

2) Overhead Press:

Stand on the middle of the resistance band and hold each end in the hand at about ear level. Press the arms overhead until they are straight. Keep your elbows close to the head as you do this. Slowly return to the starting position.

Sources & references used in this article:

Effects of evidence-based prevention training on neuromuscular and biomechanical risk factors for ACL injury in adolescent female athletes: a randomised controlled … by MK Zebis, LL Andersen, M Brandt… – British journal of sports …, 2016 – bjsm.bmj.com

Neuromuscular training improves single-limb stability in young female athletes by MV Paterno, GD Myer, KR Ford, TE Hewett – Journal of Orthopaedic & …, 2004 – jospt.org

Rationale and clinical techniques for anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention among female athletes by GD Myer, KR Ford, TE Hewett – Journal of athletic training, 2004 – ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Differential neuromuscular training effects onACL injury risk factors in” high-risk” versus” low-risk” athletes by GD Myer, KR Ford, JL Brent, TE Hewett – BMC musculoskeletal disorders, 2007 – Springer

Neuromuscular training improves performance and lower-extremity biomechanics in female athletes by GD Myer, KR Ford, OP PALUMBO… – The Journal of Strength & …, 2005 – Citeseer

The effects of plyometric vs. dynamic stabilization and balance training on power, balance, and landing force in female athletes by GD Myer, KR Ford, JL Brent, TE Hewett – Journal of strength and …, 2006 – Citeseer