The Benefits of the Smith Machine Floor Press

Smith machine floor press is one of the most popular machines used in gym today. However, it’s not just a simple machine with dumbbells attached to it. You need to learn how to use it properly if you want to reap its full potential. If you are looking for a great way to build muscle and strength without any equipment at all, then the Smith Machine Floor Press might be what you’re looking for!

The Smith Machine Floor Press is a great exercise for building up your upper body because it works several major muscle groups simultaneously. These include the chest, shoulders, triceps, bicep, deltoids and even the obliques. It also helps you develop core strength which will make you stronger overall.

You can do the Smith Machine Floor Press anywhere, but it’s best suited for a power rack or heavy duty stable like a Bosu ball. A good spot would be right after your workout when you have time to spare. If you don’t have access to such things, then go ahead and start doing them now!

How to do it:

You’ll need a flat, stable surface that you can lie down without rolling off of. Set up the ends of the barbell so that there is enough room for your arms to be fully extended without hitting the ground. For training purposes, you’ll want to secure the barbell so that it doesn’t move (this is why a power rack or stability ball is ideal). You can use a regular bench or table to set one end on if necessary.

Now that you have the barbell set up, lie down on your back with your head facing the weight plates. Grab the bar with a shoulder width, overhand grip. Press the weight off of the rack and slowly lower it until it’s a few inches from your chest. Take a deep breath and then press upwards until your arms are fully extended.

When you are done with your set, slowly lower the bar until it is a few inches from your chest again. Have someone remove the barbell from from the rack and then roll over onto your stomach. From here, slowly get up onto your hands and knees. When you are ready, hop up into a standing position.

Remember to use proper form when performing this exercise. Always make sure that your head doesn’t lead the movement or the bar could easily hit it on the way down. Always keep your back arched and chest out when performing this exercise.

Once you are confident in using the barbell, try using kettlebells or dumbbells as an alternative. You can also try this exercise on the floor (without a barbell) or in a squat rack.

The Benefits of the Smith Machine Floor Press - GYM FIT WORKOUT

Tips:

Here are a few tips to get the most out of this exercise:

Don’t waste time by resting in between sets. Instead, focus on getting the barbell back in the starting position as quickly as you can. This will keep your heart rate up and ultimately burn more calories.

To increase the challenge, wear a weighted vest or place a weight plate on your stomach. Be careful not to add so much weight that you can’t complete at least 5 full range of motion reps.

Keep your back arched and chest out when you do this exercise. This will ensure that you don’t hurt your back.

If you’re using a barbell and you don’t have anyone to spot you, have a couple of training partners place the bar in the starting position as soon as you’re done with your rep.

To increase the intensity, wear a weight vest or place a weight plate on your stomach. Be careful not to add so much weight that you can’t complete at least 5 full range of motion reps.

Variations:

There are many different ways to perform this exercise. Here are just a few examples of different exercises you can try:

Flat Bench Press – This is performed in the same way as the floor press except that you do it on a flat bench.

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