The Life-or-Death Reason Kids Need to Learn to Fail

The Life-or-Death Reason Kids Need to Learn to Fail: Why Children Should Be Able To Fail

Why do kids have such a hard time learning?

They are taught from birth that they must succeed at all costs! If they don’t, it’s because they’re lazy or stupid. However, if you really think about it, there are many reasons why kids might not be able to learn something. Some of these reasons include:

They don’t want to work hard enough (this is called “I’m too young/too weak”)

Their teachers aren’t encouraging them enough, so they give up (this is called “they’re being mean” or “their expectations are unrealistic”)

There isn’t much opportunity for them to practice their skills in school, so they quit (this is called “it’s boring!”)

They feel like they won’t get good grades anyway, so they quit (this is called “it’s too easy”)

They don’t believe in themselves, so they give up (this is called “I’m just not smart enough” or “I don’t have what it takes”)

They’ve set their minds to a goal that is so far out of reach, they’ve convinced themselves that they can’t reach it (this is called “it’s impossible”)

Why are these things such a problem?

Because kids aren’t learning the most important skill in life: how to keep going, even when the odds are against you.

Sources & references used in this article:

Change or die by A Deutschman, B Keeler – 2007 – abettercity.org

Parents’ Rights and the Value of the Family by H Brighouse, A Swift – Ethics, 2006 – journals.uchicago.edu

Children and their basic needs by DL Prince, EM Howard – Early Childhood Education Journal, 2002 – Springer

Moral distress among nursing and non-nursing students by LM Range, AL Rotherham – Nursing ethics, 2010 – journals.sagepub.com

Life or Death: The Relationship between Child Abuse and the Education System by A Wilson – 2012 – digitalcommons.liberty.edu

Life or death. The social impact of paramedics and first responders in landmine-infested villages in northern Iraq by T Wisborg, M Murad, O Edvardsen, BS Brinchmann – 2008 – rrh.org.au