The Top 10 BJJ Articles of 2014

The Top 10 BJJ Articles of 2014: Part 1 – Cobrinha & Guard Passing

Cobrinhas are used as a way to avoid being taken down or even getting mounted. They’re not just for submission attempts either; they can be used in other ways such as setting up sweeps, escapes and attacks from the bottom.

There are many different types of guard passes but here I’ll focus on the most common ones: the mount, half guard and spider guards.

In my opinion, the most effective use of cobrinhas is to prevent your opponent from mounting you. If you can get them off their feet, then it makes it much harder for them to mount you later on.

You can also use them offensively if they try to pass your guard. For example, if someone tries to pass your half guard, you can roll over onto their back and ride out the attack. Or if they try to pass your spider guard, you can roll into their open side control and finish with a kneebar or armbar. You can also use them defensively if you’ve already been mounted.

What separates a good player from a great one is their ability to use the correct techniques at the right time. An example of this is when your opponent tries to pass your spider guard.

If they’re skilled with that pass, they may get your legs apart and try to pass immediately. So you’ll need to try a sweep or a reversal if that happens. Or, they may go for the footlock instead. So you’ll need to be prepared to defend that as well. But if you notice them going for a particular attack, you can try and bait it or even prevent it from happening in the first place by using the correct defense. It’s all about choosing the right tool for the job.

THE MOUNT

The mount is one of the most dominant positions in jiu-jitsu. If you’re on your back and you don’t have a serious size advantage over your opponent, then it’s unlikely that you’ll be able to buck them off before they advance their position.

If someone gets on top of you in the mount, there is only one goal and that’s to prevent them from advancing any further. Here are some of the ways to do that:

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Pushing their hips off to the side. If you can push their hips far enough to the side, then it makes it almost impossible for them to hit any armbars or omoplata.

Keep in mind though that this will be a constant struggle and if you let your guard down for even a second then they’ll be able to advance.

Curtains. The ‘curtains’ are a way to prevent your opponent from advancing their position or even moving at all.

To do this you cross your legs around one of their arms, making it trapped. If they try to move to any side, then the arm will be yanked out of its socket. If they try to move forward then they’ll likely bang their head or face against your knee. If they try to pull back, it’ll make their arm wrench from its socket.

Defending armbars and omoplatas. The first thing you need to do is recognise what attack they’re going for.

Most people will start off with the armbar so that’s usually the first thing to look out for. After that, it’ll be whatever they do best. Some people are good at omoplatas, others are good at knee-on-belly, some are good at spinning to the back, and so on. As soon as you recognise what attack is coming, then you can begin defending it. The way to do this is to get your arm out of their reach and push their hip away with your other arm.

Defending the back takes a little more effort. If you’re small, then it’s very hard to prevent someone from getting your back.

But if you’re against a larger opponent, then they’ll have to work harder for it. What you need to do is trap one of their arms and then bridge once so that they go over your shoulder, then immediately roll back into them so they end up on the bottom. From this position, the fight becomes a lot more equalized.

Half guard has some advantages over the mount but many of the same defensive principles still apply. Here are some things that you can do:

Buttock Pressure. This is a simple but effective method to prevent someone from passing your guard.

All you need to do is push your bottom into their stomach, making it harder for them to move backwards.

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Knee Pressure. Most people who are trying to pass your guard are going to want to push your legs apart in order to get some space so that they can move their hips down.

If you constantly push your knees together, then it makes it impossible for them to do this. You should also try and cross your feet so that they end up in the triangle position which makes it even harder for them to move.

Taking their back. If you’re small and weak then it can be very hard to prevent people from passing your guard.

One way to counter this is to immediately take their back once they try to pass. This puts you in a much more favourable position and lets you take the dominant role. Here’s a video tutorial:

If you still find that you’re struggling to get out of the mount, then I have one more advice which might help. You can try and turn this position into a half guard.

Here’s a video explaining how to do it:

Once you’re in the half guard, then you should have equalized your chances against your opponent. You’ll also find that many of the techniques in the bottom of the half guard are similar to those found in the full guard.

So, if you continue to train these positions, then you’ll find that your knowledge will easily transfer between each one.

Another advantage of this position is that it’s harder for your opponent to hit you. This means that it’s a safer position for you to train and explore without the worry of taking a heavy blow to the head.

If you do this consistently every time, then it’ll become a habit and almost second nature whenever you’re on your back. This means that you’ll be able to do it without having to consciously think about what you’re doing.

This will allow your mind to focus on other things such as strategies and tactics.

I hope this helps and aids you in your training.

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Resources:

Here are some examples of websites that have helpful tips on defending the mount:

Defending the Mount by BJJ Hacks

7 Tips For Passing The Guard by Stephan Kesting

How to Tie a Shrimping Squeeze by Grapplearts

How to Avoid the Rear Naked Choke by Grapplearts

Staying Safe in the Mount and Back Positions by Stephan Kesting

How to Tie the Catching Shrimp by Grapplearts

How to Get Out of the Rear Mount by Grapplearts

How to Get Back to the Guard by Grapplearts

How to Defend the Mount Position by Grapplearts

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How to Escape the Rear Mount by Grapplearts

How to Get Back to the Guard by Grapplearts

How to Get Back to the Guard by Grapplearts

How to Get Out of the Turtle Position by Grapplearts

How to Get Out of the Turtle Position by Grapplearts

How to Escape the Turtle Position by Grapplearts

How to Get Back to the Guard by Grapplearts

How to Get Back to the Closed Guard by Grapplearts

How to Get Back to the Closed Guard by Grapplearts

How to Survive the Mount by Grapplearts

How to Turn a Loss into a Draw by Grapplearts

How to Survive the Rear Mount by Grapplearts

The Top 10 BJJ Articles of 2014 - GymFitWorkout

How to Get Out of the Back Position by Grapplearts

How to Get Back to the Closed Guard by Grapplearts

How to Get Back to the Closed Guard by Grapplearts

How to Stay Safe in the Turtle Position by Grapplearts

How to Defend the Mount Position by Grapplearts

How to Defend the Back Position by Grapplearts

How to Defend the Turtle Position by Grapplearts

How to Defend the Half Guard by Grapplearts

How to Defend the Full Mount by Grapplearts

The Top 10 BJJ Articles of 2014 - from our website

How to Defend the Knee Cut by Grapplearts

How to Defend the Leg Drag by Grapplearts

How to Defend the Single Wing Choke by Grapplearts

How to Defend the Arm Triangle from the Guard by Grapplearts

How to Defend the Crossface from the Guard by Grapplearts

How to Defend the Arm Bar from the Guard by Grapplearts

How to Defend the Kimura from the Guard by Grapplearts

Sources & references used in this article:

Tissue-mimicking gel phantoms for thermal therapy studies by A Dabbagh, BJJ Abdullah… – Ultrasonic …, 2014 – journals.sagepub.com

Achieving resonance in the Advanced LIGO gravitational-wave interferometer by …, RMS Schofield, D Sigg, BJJ Slagmolen… – … and Quantum Gravity, 2014 – iopscience.iop.org

An improved titration model reducing over estimation of total volatile fatty acids in anaerobic digestion of energy crop, animal slurry and food waste by BJJ Purser, SM Thai, T Fritz, SR Esteves, RM Dinsdale… – Water research, 2014 – Elsevier

Quantum squeezed light in gravitational-wave detectors by SSY Chua, BJJ Slagmolen, DA Shaddock… – … and quantum gravity, 2014 – iopscience.iop.org

Robot-assisted radiofrequency ablation of primary and secondary liver tumours: early experience by BJJ Abdullah, CH Yeong, KL Goh, BK Yoong, GF Ho… – European …, 2014 – Springer

Stress distributions in maxillary central incisors restored with various types of post materials and designs by …, J Marhazlinda, R Rahbari, BJJ Abdullah… – Medical engineering & …, 2014 – Elsevier