The Ultimate Guide to Muscle Group Split Training

The Ultimate Guide to Muscle Group Split Training:

What Is Muscle Groups?

Muscle groups are defined as any group of muscles that work together to produce movement. Muscles may be isolated from each other or they may include multiple types of muscle fibers working in concert. The type of exercise performed determines which type of muscle fiber is used during the exercise. For example, when performing bench press, the deltoids and triceps fibers are activated. When performing pull up, the bicep fibers are recruited.

When you perform different exercises with your body weight (muscle), you activate different muscle groups at various times during the exercise. Some of these muscle groups will become fatigued first while others will remain active throughout the duration of the exercise.

A muscle group consists of one or more muscles that are all working together to produce movement. Each muscle group is made up of many individual muscles. These individual muscles have different functions such as contracting, relaxing, moving, and supporting the whole unit. A single muscle may contract independently but it cannot function without the support of its surrounding musculature.

Thus, a complete contraction requires all the available muscle groups to work together to achieve maximum results.

The most common muscle groups that people talk about are:

1. Deltoids (Shoulder Muscles)

2. Bicep (Forearm Muscle)

3. Tricep (Forearm Muscle)

4. Quadriceps (Thigh Muscles)

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5. Hamstrings (Thigh Muscles)

6. Glutes (Buttocks Muscles)

7. Calves (Lower Leg Muscles)

The above list represents the top muscle groups that are targeted by most weight lifters, body builders, and fitness enthusiasts.

What Are Muscle Group Splits?

A muscle group split is simply a way of organizing which groups of muscles you are planning to train within a given time period. There are a couple of different ways that you can organize these muscle groups.

One way is by the day of the week that you plan to do your weight lifting or other strength training. An example of this would be to train all of your muscles on Monday, then again on Thursday, and alternating which muscle groups you train on these days.

Another option is by the part of the body that the muscle groups are located. An example of this would be to train all the muscles in your upper body during one time period and then train all of the muscles in the lower body during another time period.

What Are The Advantages Of A Muscle Group Split?

There are many advantages to using a muscle group split. One of these advantages is that it allows you to give each muscle group adequate attention without over working it or any of the other groups.

Another advantage of a muscle group split is that it allows you to give all of the various muscles targeted within a muscle group adequate attention without overworking them or any of the other groups.

What Are The Disadvantages Of A Muscle Group Split?

There are also some disadvantages to using a muscle group split. One of these disadvantages is that it can sometimes be confusing as far as organizing your workouts.

Another disadvantage of a muscle group split is that it can sometimes leave other parts of your body under trained such as your core.

What Other Types Of Muscle Group Splits Are There?

There are many other types of muscle group splits but they all revolve around the same general concept. One split that is very popular with strength trainers and body builders is called “push-pull.” The push-pull split is where you divide the muscles into groups based on the action of the movement.

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The “push” group consists of the muscles that are primarily responsible for extending your joints. This would include your triceps and pectorals. The “pull” group consists of the muscles that are primarily responsible for flexing your joints. This would include your bicep and the back muscles.

The core is typically worked every day in some fashion. The intensity of your workouts can also vary. Some body builders prefer high intensity every day and others prefer a more traditional split routine.

Another popular muscle group split is called the “evening split.” The even split is where you divide the muscles into groups based on the part of the body that they are located. This would include the shoulders and chest, back and abdominals, legs and shoulders and arms and forearm.

The abdominal muscles are typically trained two to three times a week. This is in relation to the other muscle groups that are being targeted. Many body builders will work their abs every day.

This type of split focuses more on strengthening and defining your muscles rather than building mass. This is good for someone who wants to get into competition shape or just wants to look good at the beach.

What Is The Right Muscle Group Split For Me?

Not everyone is the same which is why there is no one “perfect” muscle group split that is right for everyone.

Sources & references used in this article:

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The Ultimate Guide to Training Frequency for Muscle Mass by M Castleman, SS Hendler – 1995 – Bantam

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The Ultimate Guide to Weight Training for Swimming by BT Basics, YGTAS Back – rudymawer.com

Effect of two-versus three-way split resistance training routines on body composition and muscular strength in bodybuilders: a pilot study by RG Price – 2003 – books.google.com

Effects of resistance training frequency on measures of muscle hypertrophy: a systematic review and meta-analysis by R Price – 2005 – books.google.com

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Nolan Ryan’s pitcher’s Bible: The ultimate guide to power, precision, and long-term performance by BJ Schoenfeld, D Ogborn, JW Krieger – Sports Medicine, 2016 – Springer