The Weak Swimmer’s Guide to Starting Triathlon

The Weak Swimmer’s Guide to Starting Triathlon: Non Swimers

Non swimmers are those who don’t participate in any sport or activity that involves physical exertion. They include all types of people, from the most physically fit individuals to the least fit. Some non swimmers may not even consider themselves athletes.

Some non swimmers just have no interest in sports, while others do not feel like they need to get out their gym membership every time they go swimming. Others simply choose not to engage in activities because of health reasons. And some people just aren’t interested in participating at all!

There are many different kinds of non swimmers. You might be one of them if you’re reading this article!

What Are Non Swimmers?

You probably think that everyone who participates in sports is a non swimmer, but that isn’t necessarily true. There are several other groups of people who participate in sports without getting sweaty or tired, and they fall into the following categories:

1) Competitive Athletes – These folks enjoy competition with others.

They train hard to improve their skills and abilities. Some of these people are professionals, but others participate in college or community athletic programs. They need to exercise a lot to stay in shape for their sport. They also need to think strategically about their sport in order to win.

2) Hobbyists – These are people who like to participate in one or more sports on a casual basis.

They may not be in “great shape,” but they also don’t overdo it. They have fun and don’t take themselves too seriously.

3) Spectators – These are people who watch other people do sports.

The Weak Swimmer's Guide to Starting Triathlon - | Gym Fit Workout

It could be their job (like being a coach), or it could be a hobby. They may even be former athletes who got too old to compete. Either way, they like to see others do the sport, which means they’re still invested in that world. They do it for fun, and that’s it. They don’t make a big deal out of it, but they still like to have fun and compete with others at their skill level.

6) Fitness Enthusiasts – These are people who don’t necessarily play sports, but they still get exercise on a regular basis. They jog, run, swim, bike, stretch, do yoga or pilates, etc. They keep themselves in good shape.

7) Passionates – These are people who just love the adrenaline rush that comes from doing something physical.

They like to go snowboarding, biking, running, climbing, or do some other activity that gets their hearts pumping.

8) Novices – These are people who participate in a single sport on a casual basis.

They may have some skill at that sport, but often make common mistakes. They are still learning the basics of their chosen activity.

9) Occasional Participants – These are people who participate in sports once in a while.

Maybe they only play a certain sport during the summer or on a school break. As soon as that season ends, they go back to not playing any sports at all.

10) Non-Participants – These are people who don’t participate in any sports. They might not have the time, money, or interest to do so.

So, where do you belong?

You can put yourself in whatever category you want. There are probably dozens of other options we didn’t include, but we tried to hit the main ones.

Try to pick the description that sounds the most like you. If you’re having trouble, look at some of the other options before deciding.

Remember, everyone is somewhere on this scale. You are not a “sportsperson” if you’re not active in any way. You can still be a fan of sports, even if you’re not an athlete.

You can identify with more than one category, too. For instance, you might be a competitive athlete and a dedicated fan. The categories listed are not mutually exclusive, and you can identify with multiple ones.

 

Sources & references used in this article:

Medical considerations in triathlon competition by GM Dallam, S Jonas, TK Miller – Sports Medicine, 2005 – Springer

The complete guide to triathlon training by H Aschwer – 2001 – books.google.com

The triathlon of magnetic actuation: Rolling, propelling, swimming with a single magnetic material by PJ Vach, D Faivre – Scientific reports, 2015 – nature.com