Train at Home on a Time Crunch

Train at Home on a Time Crunch

The time crunch is one of the most common problems that people face when they are trying to lose weight. They want to get rid of their excess pounds but don’t have enough time or energy to do it.

There are many ways in which you can try to cut down your food intake, but if you really want to achieve success, then you need some sort of plan that will allow you to stay focused and motivated all the while losing weight.

You might think that going out and doing strenuous activities like running around the park would be a good way to burn calories, but there is another option: train at home. You could use free weights or machines to perform various exercises.

However, these methods aren’t always effective because they require too much time and effort. Another alternative is to use a combination of both methods. That’s where the idea of Train at Home comes into play.

There are several benefits to using a combination of different types of training at home. First off, you won’t waste any money on expensive equipment since you can make them yourself with household items.

Second, you’ll save time by not having to go out and buy things. Thirdly, you’ll be able to focus on other aspects of your life such as studying or work instead of worrying about how much weight you’re going to put on during the day.

Choose a Repetition Range

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One of the things that you’re going to want to decide on is what kind of repetition range you’re going to use when you train. If you’re familiar with body building, then you probably already know that there are three main repetition ranges: low, medium, and high.

A low repetition range focuses on building strength, while a medium repetition range focuses on building both strength and size. A high repetition range focuses more on increasing endurance and size.

Personally, I would suggest using a low repetition range since this is more of a powerlifting routine than a body building routine. It’s mostly designed to increase strength.

Now, you might be wondering why you wouldn’t want to do that if your main goal is to lose weight since strength will contribute to that. However, the trick with lifting heavy weights is that you do not need to go all out. You should only be attempting to increase the amount of weight that you’re using by a few pounds per week. If you attempt to do more than that, then you’re going to end up getting weighed down too much and you won’t be able to keep up with your endurance.

Your main goal with this routine is going to be to keep up with the low repetition range while still trying to increase the amount of weight that you’re using. If you’re following a routine that uses a high repetition range, then you’ll want to decrease the amount of weight that you’re using so that you don’t end up getting weighed down.

Focus on Doing The Exercises Properly

Another thing that is very important when doing any kind of lifting is that you focus on doing the exercises properly. Personally, I would highly advise that you get the assistance of a personal trainer at least during your first couple of weeks of training.

If you can’t afford a personal trainer, then I would next suggest finding a workout video that demonstrates proper form for each exercise. After that, the only thing that you can do is either ask another person at your local gym to help you or look up the exercise online and find some advice on how it should be done.

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First, make sure that you have a spotter. If you’re going to be bench pressing a barbell on a bench, make sure that there’s another person standing behind the bench in case you should have trouble getting the bar back onto the ground.

If you’re going to be squatting or deadlifting, make sure that there’s another person with you in case your form fails and the weight falls on you. It could possibly save your life.

Your main exercises are going to be bench press, squat, deadlift, and power cleans. Those are the most important ones.

There are others that are recommended, but only focus on them if you have the time and energy. They include: shoulder press, bent over row, chin ups, dips, standing calf raises, and any other abdominal exercise.

First, we’re going to start off with the power cleans. I’m not going to go too in-depth on these since I’ve already written an entire step-by-step guide for these, but I’ll give a quick rundown on how to perform them.

Lay down a thick mat to protect your floor and to provide a comfortable grip on the floor. Bend your knees and have your feet flat on the floor with your heels close together.

Hold the bar slightly wider than your legs and tighten your arms and chest. Quickly but with good form move the bar from your legs above your head. Try to keep your arms nearly straight during this move, but if you’re having a hard time with it, you can take it a bit slower. After the bar reaches at least forehead height, quickly extend your arms and shrug your shoulders upward while pulling the bar as close to your shoulders as possible. Return the bar to the floor by first bending your arms and then slowly lowering the bar to the ground.

When you’re just starting out, I would advise against using a bar with more than 185 lb weight since it will most likely be too heavy for you to get good practice at the actual movement of cleaning the bar and it also makes it harder to return the bar on the floor since it’s such a heavy weight.

The routine will have you doing power cleans in four week blocks with each week having a different set scheme. This first week is just to get you used to the exercise and is the lightest weight that you’ll be using.

There are two different plans provided for this program. The first one is for three days a week and has you training on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday while resting on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.

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The other is for four days a week and has you training on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday while resting on Wednesday and Saturday. You can pick whichever one best fits your schedule. For the four day per week plan you’ll simply repeat that four day cycle twice so that it matches up with the three day cycle plan.

The weight increases each week are to make sure that you’re always progressing. You will not increase the weight on the third week of this program.

Week One

Monday

Exercise Weight Sets Reps Power Clean Warm-Up 20 0 2/0.5

Exercise Weight Sets Reps Power Clean (from above) 100 1 5 Clean Pull 130 1 3 High Hang Clean 155 1 3 Low Hang Clean 185 1 3 Deadlift 200 1 3

Wednesday

Exercise Weight Sets Reps Power Snatch Warm-Up 20 0 2/0.5

Exercise Weight Sets Reps Power Snatch (from above) 70 1 5 Snatch Pull 100 1 3 High Hang Snatch 90 1 3 Low Hang Snatch 110 1 3 Deadlift 130 1 3

Friday

Exercise Weight Sets Reps Power Clean Warm-Up 20 0 2/0.5

Exercise Weight Sets Reps Power Clean (from above) 100 1 3 Clean Pull 130 1 3 High Hang Clean 155 1 3 Low Hang Clean 185 1 3 Deadlift 200 1 3

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Week Two

Monday

Exercise Weight Sets Reps Power Snatch Warm-Up 20 0 2/0.5

Exercise Weight Sets Reps Power Snatch (from above) 75 1 5 Snatch Pull 100 1 3 High Hang Snatch 90 1 3 Low Hang Snatch 115 1 3 Deadlift 135 1 3

Wednesday

Exercise Weight Sets Reps Power Clean Warm-Up 20 0 2/0.5

Exercise Weight Sets Reps Power Clean (from above) 100 1 3 Clean Pull 135 1 3 High Hang Clean 160 1 3 Low Hang Clean 190 1 3 Deadlift 200 1 3

Friday

Exercise Weight Sets Reps Power Snatch Warm-Up 20 0 2/0.5

Exercise Weight Sets Reps Power Snatch (from above) 80 1 5 Snatch Pull 110 1 3 High Hang Snatch 95 1 3 Low Hang Snatch 120 1 3 Deadlift 145 1 3

Week Three

Monday

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Rest

Wednesday

Exercise Weight Sets Reps Power Clean Warm-Up 20 0 2/0.5

Exercise Weight Sets Reps Power Clean (from above) 95 1 3 Clean Pull 140 1 3 High Hang Clean 165 1 3 Low Hang Clean 195 1 3 Deadlift 210 1 3

Friday

Rest

As you can see, the program is very simple to follow and should be easy to get results from if you’re consistent with it. Make sure that on the last set of every exercise that you try to push yourself for as many reps as you can get.

If you find that you’re limited by your energy, take a five minute break and then come back to the gym.

Exercise Tips

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The power snatch is going to be the most difficult exercise for most people because it’s an explosive movement. The main key for this exercise is to bend your legs and try to use as much of your lower body as you can to get that weight up.

Think about jumping and pulling the bar up with your arms at the same time.

Breathing is also important with this movement because you’re attempting to do it as fast as you can. Take a deep breath in, hold it.

Then do the movement described above. After you hit that last repetition, take another deep breath and then relax.

Deadlifting can be difficult for many people as well because they don’t know how to engage their core enough to lift the weight. The main thing to remember is to focus on bending at the hips and not at the waist.

That means your legs should bend more than your upper body.

On week three you can see that we left out back extensions and calf work. These can be added in if you feel you need them, or you can replace any of the other exercises with them.

The reason we left them out on this program is because they weren’t geared towards increasing your power in line with the rest of the training.

def·i·ni·tion

A power clean is when an Olympic weightlifter pulls a heavy barbell from the floor to his chest and lifts it to the standing position using only his arms and legs.

Sets and Reps Explained

The number of sets for each exercise depends on the number chosen in each workout. For example, if you choose 4 sets for bench press then you will do 4 sets of bench press during that day.

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There are three numbers listed for each exercise. The first number is the amount of sets, the second is how much weight you will use, and the third is how many reps you will do.

For example:

These numbers are based on the pyramid system. So, using our bench press example, it would look like this:

Bar x 1 rep x 4 sets

95 x 5 reps x 4 sets

135 x 3 reps x 4 sets

165 x 1 rep x 4 sets

This just means you would do a total of 12 reps for that day. You will rotate these 12 reps through out the program as you see fit.

You will have to find the right weights for each exercise, which shouldn’t be too hard. If you are new to weight training, you can ask your friends or get a trainer until you get the hang of it.

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The Exercises

Barbell Bench Press – This is the standard bench press most gyms have.

Barbell Row – This is the row machine most gyms have. If yours doesn’t, then you can do T-Bar Rows or some gyms even have Cable Rows.

Flat Barbell Bench Press – This is the same as a normal bench press except your lower yourself to the ground and then lift the weight back up. The range of motion is shorter with these so they are easier on your joints but still work your muscles.

Barbell Deadlift – This is the classic weight lifting exercise where you pick a barbell off the floor using just your legs.

Weighted Decline Dumbbell Press – This exercise is like benching on a decline bench. So, while you’re pressing the weight with both arms, you’re also leaning back.

This takes the stress off your chest and puts it on your shoulders.

Weighted Dip – This is just like a normal dip except you add weight by holding a plate in each hand or putting them on a belt around your waist.

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Weighted Pull-up – This is a pull-up where you add weight with a belt or something similar.

Barbell Row – Same as above.

Pull-up – Same as above.

Barbell Bench Press – Same as above.

Pullover and Press – lie down on a bench and lift a weight from your chest to over your head. Then lift it over your head and lower it in front of you until it touches your belly button.

Keep the weight over your belly button and lift your legs up so your feet are off the ground and you’re balancing on your back and neck. Lie back slowly until the weight touches the ground. The push the weight back up over your head and lower it in front of you until it touches your belly button.

Lower the weight down toward one side of your body, using your elbow to carry the weight past your belly button then lift it back to the starting position. Keep repeating this process but switch sides halfway through.

Dumbbell One Arm Row – lie on your back on a bench and hold a dumbbell in one hand. Let the weight stretch your arm back as far as possible without moving your body and lift the weight to the side as far as possible.

Keep your arm stretched out as you lower the weight down toward the floor on the same side as the arm you’re rowing.

Approach this program like you would any other, by warming up first. Warm up your whole body with light weights before jumping right into this program.

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As far as the exercises in this program go, you’ll be doing them as heavy singles.

What’s a heavy single?”

A heavy single is the heaviest weight you can lift once with proper form. On these, you’re looking for speed on the way up and controlled slow movement on the way down. If you don’t know what proper form is then ask someone or look it up online.

One key thing to remember here is to never sacrifice your form for more weight. You’ll know a weight is too heavy if you feel like you’re in danger of getting hurt.

For example, if you’re doing a barbell row and can’t get the weight up to your chest and you’re using your arms, then that weight is too heavy. You should be pulling with your back not your arms.

You’ll be doing all the exercises as heavy singles except for the deadlifts. You’re going to do 3 sets of 5 reps with 90% of your 1 repetition maximum on this exercise.

If you don’t know what that means then just do 3 sets of 5 reps the best you can.

This is a 4 day program so you’ll be exercising every weekday. On weekends, take off or do some sort of fun activity that doesn’t involve exercise at all.

Monday – Day 1

Warm up for at least 10 minutes

Weighted Dips – 5 x as many as you can with proper form

Weighted Pull-ups – 5 x as many as you can with proper form

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Deadlift – 3 x 5 (90% of 1RM)

Barbell Row – 3 x 5 (90% of 1RM)

Tuesday – Day 2

Warm up for at least 10 minutes

Weighted Pull-ups – 5 x as many as you can with proper form

Barbell Bench Press – 5 x 5 (90% of 1RM)

Standing Overhead Press – 5 x 5 (90% of 1RM)

Barbell Curl – 5 x 5 (90% of 1RM)

Wednesday – Day 3

Warm up for at least 10 minutes

Barbell Deadlift – 3 x 5 (90% of 1RM)

Weighted Dips – 5 x as many as you can with proper form

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Standing Overhead Press – 5 x 5 (90% of 1RM)

One-Arm Dumbbell Row – 5 x 5 (90% of 1RM)

Thursday – Day 4

Warm up for at least 10 minutes

Weighted Pull-Ups – 5 x as many as you can with proper form

Barbell Bench Press – 5 x 5 (90% of 1RM)

Squat – 5 x 5 (90% of 1RM)

Preacher Curl – 5 x 5 (90% of 1RM)

Friday – Day 5

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Warm up for at least 10 minutes

One-Arm Dumbbell Row – 5 x 5 (90% of 1RM)

Deadlift – 3 x 5 (90% of 1RM)

Barbell Row – 3 x 5 (90% of 1RM)

Standing Overhead Press – 5 x 5 (90% of 1RM)

Barbell Curl – 5 x 5 (90% of 1RM)

You’ll notice that there are some repetition numbers after certain exercises. These are the maximum number of reps you should be doing on any of these exercises.

If you can do more than the recommended number then the weight is too light. To be blunt, if you’re not struggling to get the weight from point A to point B then the weight is too light. If you want to grow, you need to be using a weight that makes these exercises hard.

Proper form is also important as using bad form will not only not work the intended muscle group but can also cause injury. If you’re unsure of proper form then ask someone who is educated in that exercise or do an internet search.

You can do these workouts in any order you desire. I put three days together because I think that’s how the creator had it but don’t think that you’ll be weak by only working a body part every three days.

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The program is set up so that you’re working every muscle group every 5 days which is more than enough for growth and strength gain. Trust the program, it works if you work it!

Also, do one, and only one warm up set for each exercise. Just do the weight you’re going to use for your working set and then move on.

Don’t be a lazy bum and do multiple work sets unless you’re doing the workout listed as non-stop.

Don’t bother counting calories or anything like that, just try to eat as healthy as you can afford to.

You may also have 1 cheat meal every week, have some candy or something similar.

The program is fairly simple and the hardest part is putting in the work. Like anything, success depends on you.

Good luck and keep working hard!

Sources & references used in this article:

It’s crunch time: raising youth engagement and attainment: a discussion paper by Australian Industry Group Dusseldorp Skills Forum … – 2007 – voced.edu.au

The Computerization Time Crunch by GC Bowker – Computer, 2019 – ieeexplore.ieee.org

Crunch Time by M Bridges – 2009 – books.google.com

Team work help to survive the user services crunch by K Colbert, KS Finder – Proceedings of the 20th annual ACM SIGUCCS …, 1992 – dl.acm.org

Time demands of caring for children with cerebral palsy: what are the implications for maternal mental health? by MG Sawyer, M Bittman, AM La Greca… – … Medicine & Child …, 2011 – Wiley Online Library

Talent crunch by M Littleton – 1990 – Moody Pub

Having it all or doing it all? The construction of women’s lifestyles in time-crunched households by CareerBuilder – 2012 – voced.edu.au

Measuring operative performance after laparoscopic skills training: edited videotape versus direct observation by AR Hochschild – 2001 – Macmillan