Train Like a Rugby Pro – In Less Time and With Less Violence

Train like a Rugby Pro – In Less Time And With Less Violence (TLRP)

The TLRP is a rugby training program designed to help players improve their skills and make them better at playing rugby union. The goal of the TLRP is to get players fit enough so they are able to play longer without getting tired or injured. Players must train with weights, but not too much because it’s important that they do not overtrain themselves.

A typical workout might look something like this:

Workout 1: Strength Training

Exercise Sets Reps A Pull Ups 3 10 B Barbell Row 5 15 C Dumbell Curl 4 12 D Standing Military Press 6 20 E Seated Cable Rows 8 30 F Weighted Chin Up 9 25 G Face Pulls 11 35 H One Arm Dumbbell Row 13 40 Total = 45 reps.

Workout 2: Speed Training

Exercise Sets Reps I Squat Jumping Jumps 3 10 II Plyometrics 3 12 III Agility Workouts 3 12 IV Sprinting 7 20 V Wall Sits 7 20 VI Step Ups 8 30 VII Side Steps 8 30 VIII Handstand Pushups 9 25 IX Plank 9 25 X Sit Ups 10 35 XC = “X” means exercise is optional.

What Is The Best Way To Get Fit?

There are lots of ways in which a person can get fit. It’s important to find something that you enjoy doing so you’re more likely to stick with it on a long term basis. For some people, going to the gym or playing local sports is the most enjoyable option, for others, something like running or swimming suits them better. There are pros and cons to all different types of exercise programs and different programs are better suited to different people.

If you are a complete beginner to exercise, it’s recommended that you get advice from your family doctor before embarking on any new exercise program. He or she will be able to make sure you don’t have any underlying medical conditions that might prevent you from taking part in strenuous physical activity. They will also be able to make suggestions about a program suitable for you and provide tips and guidance on how to get the most out of your chosen physical activity.

What Is The Best Form Of Exercise?

There are several hundred scientific studies that have been undertaken to determine the best form of exercise. They have evaluated a wide range of different types of physical activity from low impact to high impact and from relaxing to hardcore. The below list is a summary of the types that have come out tops in the research:

Aerobic exercise – This is exercise that gets your heart rate up and keeps it up. Walking, jogging, swimming, cycling, dancing and any other sport that gets your breathing fast and keeps it fast is a good example of aerobic exercise. This sort of exercise is great for strengthening the heart, it burns lots of calories and it increases your overall endurance so you get tired less quickly.

Stretching – Stretching is very important when trying to stay fit because it ensures that the muscles you are using remain supple and don’t get strained or pulled. If you are new to exercise, it’s recommended that you stretch as part of your warm up before starting any other physical activity.

Weight training – Weight training is a great way to tone up and get fit because it strengthens your muscles and helps increase your metabolism which burns more calories even when you are not working out. It’s also a great way to relieve built up stress as it allows you to burn off any angry energy that might be building up inside.

Games – Most people think of games as something you play at parties or with friends and not something you do to stay in shape, but games like basketball, handball, tag and dodgeball are fantastic ways of getting exercise. They all involve lots of running up and down and getting lots of oxygen to your muscles which helps improve cardiovascular fitness.

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Dance – Dance is another great way to get fit. It’s not just for girls and it’s not just for ladies. Dancing is great fun and it’s an aerobic activity so it gets your heart rate up and keeps it up. You can go dancing in clubs or you can buy tapes and DVDs and dance in the comfort of your own home.

Rock climbing – For some people, the best way to get exercise is by conquering a giant rock face. Rock climbing uses a whole array of different muscles and working together. It also helps improve balance which can be beneficial in preventing falls and accidents.

Exercising With Friends

There is evidence to suggest that if you exercise with friends you are more likely to continue your program and it is also likely to be more fun. There are lots of activities that you can do with friends from team sports to races to extreme endurance events.

What Is The Best Time Of Day To Exercise?

Most fitness professionals recommend exercising first thing in the morning immediately after you wake up. There are a number of benefits to doing it first thing:

Your metabolism is at its highest just after you wake up. This is because you have been resting and your body has slowed down your metabolism as a result. So the moment you wake up your body starts ramping it back up ready for the day’s fast approaching activities. This means that your body is very ready to burn off any fat and calories.

Exercising first thing in the morning sends out a clear signal to your body that it needs to rev up and get itself ready for the busy day ahead. This means that your body will burn off more fat and calories throughout the day.

Exercising before you have done anything else makes it much easier to get yourself to do it again tomorrow because you will already be used to it. If you put it off until later in the day, you will find yourself much more tempted to put it off again the next day.

Waking up just a little earlier each day means that after a week you will already be in the habit of rising early and you can get on with your program without having to force yourself to wake up early each day.

How Long Should My Workout Be?

When you are just starting out, it’s usually best to keep your workouts pretty short. This is mainly because if you start too aggressive a program, it can easily lead to injury and once you’re injured, it can set back your schedule by weeks or even months.

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The other reason is that keeping your workouts short but intense is better for your body which will give you faster results in the long run. This is mainly because the body tends to respond to stress, if you work it too hard, then give it time to recover and then repeat this process a few times, it will build up its ability to deal with that level of work thus building up your endurance and strength.

This is why professional athletes train for much shorter periods than amateurs but often work out much harder.

The key is to find your ideal “workout window.” This is the time between when you wake up and when you must be at work or whatever else you have to do each day. So some people may have a 6 hour window where they can exercise, while others may only have an hour and a half. Working out before or after this time frame should, ideally, be avoided if possible because it will make getting to sleep harder (before) and will take away time you could be sleeping (after).

Keeping your workouts to around an hour and a half will help you avoid over-training, so keep an eye on the clock to make sure you aren’t exceeding this time limit.

What Should I Do If I Have A Lot Of Time To Exercise?

This is a problem that many people wish they had! If you have more than two hours to exercise each day then split it up into three different sessions rather than doing it all at once. Your body needs time to rest so that it can rebuild itself, just like building a house, you can’t just build it and move straight in, you need to let it “set” for a little while first. This is called “delayed onset muscle soreness,” or DOMS for short. It’s the reason you feel sore after working out, but if you don’t let it rest then your muscles wont rebuild and you wont get stronger.

So if you have a large block of time to exercise then split it up into three 30 minute sessions. Any longer than that and your body wont have had time to rest and will be more prone to injury or failure.

How Much Weight Should I Use?

Using too much weight is a common mistake for many people who are just starting out with working out. It looks cool to be able to lift a lot of weight, but the reality is you need to be able to lift a weight many times without getting fatigued. So always start off light and work your way up. When you can do a exercise for several reps with perfect form then it’s time to increase the weight.

This is called “progressive overload” and it’s the key to building muscle. The body wont grow unless you challenge it, this is why using as much weight as possible isn’t the way to go.

You’ll end up with large muscles, but they wont be strong muscles and if they aren’t strong muscles then what’s the point?

How Can I Make Sure I’m Doing Each Exercise Correctly?

This is a very common concern for beginners, they often don’t know if they are doing each exercise properly to get the most out of it and avoid injury. The best way to do this is to get a trainer at your local gym to show you how to do each exercise properly, this one on one attention will ensure that you are getting all the benefits that you can be getting out of working out.

If this isn’t possible then there are a few things you can do. First of all, make sure you are stretching before and after you do each exercise. Stretching is vital to muscle growth because if your muscles are tight then they won’t be able to grow as well.

Secondly, pay attention to your form. Many exercises have a wrong way to do them and a right way. The wrong way will not get the desired results and can also cause injury. For example, lifting weights with bad form can cause back injuries quite easily.

Finally, if you aren’t sure about something don’t be afraid to ask someone. Most people at the gym are friendly and will be happy to help you if you ask them politely. You shouldn’t be embarrassed to ask for help either, no one starts off knowing everything.

What If I Want To Do My Workouts At Home?

Many people get intimidated by going to the gym and prefer to workout at home instead. While this is a perfectly valid option in many cases, it isn’t the best for everyone. The type of workouts you do will depend on your financial situation and living circumstances.

For example, if you live alone or with a spouse then you have the perfect setting to do all the exercises you need to build muscle. You have tons of weights in machines already available to you as well as barbells and dumbbells for free weight exercises.

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If you live with a family then things are a bit more difficult, but not impossible. If you have your own room that you can lock then you’re in luck since you have everything you need to workout. Just make sure your family knows when you’re using it and don’t forget to do your stretches!

Finally, if you live in an apartment or shared housing of some kind then you’re going to have the most difficult time doing effective workouts. The reason for this is that you probably don’t have a lot of weights and what you do have access to may not be the best to use.

In this case I would highly recommend purchasing some dumbbells ranging from 15-60lbs. This way you can do all your exercises using only dumbbells and don’t need a lot of space. You can do everything from dumbbell bench presses to squats to shoulder presses. Just make sure you keep your routine interesting and change the exercises you do every month or so.

As I mentioned, if you have a lot of weights in machines already then by all means use them. But if you don’t have access to these, then the dumbbells are a great substitute that can be used pretty much anywhere.

Now that you have an idea of how to get started with weight training, let’s talk about what type of routine to do. There is a lot of information on the web about workout routines and many are very complicated. Some are so complicated that no matter how hard you try, you just can’t seem to understand them.

While I’m going to suggest a routine, I’m not going to make it overly complicated. I’m also going to keep it as simple to understand as possible.

I’m going to base this routine on the current science of muscle building and avoidance of injury. As you gain more experience, you can then add in whatever else you want to do because the basics of this routine will provide a good foundation for the later more complex routines.

Who Is This Routine For?

This routine is designed for someone who does not currently exercise at all or someone who has not been doing any weight training. This routine will also improve the condition of someone who is currently exercising, but is still doing a lot of aerobic type exercises and does some weight training as well.

For example, this would be ideal for someone who primarily does cardio kickboxing twice a week and does some weight training on some other days. The kickboxing may provide some muscle endurance and strength benefits, but it won’t provide the gains in size and strength that true weight training will provide.

What Equipment Is Needed?

For this routine all you really need is some dumbbells from relatively light to relatively heavy. If you can, get at least two pairs of dumbbells: light and medium weight and maybe some heavier ones too. You may already have some of these at home if you’ve been using them for other exercises, but if not, they are relatively cheap at most department stores and even cheaper online.

You will also need a flat bench to do the exercises that require a bench. If you don’t have a bench, you can always do without it or find something else to substitute (step below the bench, have a spotter help you with the heavier weights, etc.)

What About The Rest Of My Body?

It’s important not to forget that your body isn’t just your arms or chest or legs. It’s important to work everything evenly in order to have a balanced body. For this routine, you can do a few other simple exercises in order to work the rest of your body as well.

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The exercises in this routine include:

It’s not necessary to do these, but if you want a well-balanced exercise routine that will improve all areas of your fitness, then you should try to add these in.

How Many Sets And Reps?

We’re not going to worry about sets and reps just yet because I’m going to explain how to figure those out and you can do that when we get to that part of the program.

What We Need To Do First Is Pick A Starting Point

I would highly recommend that you read the whole program first and then start it at a later date, but if you want to start right away, here is what I would recommend as a starting point. Remember that this is just a recommendation. You can always adjust it later based on how your body reacts to the exercise.

For each exercise, pick a weight that allows you to complete the last 3-5 reps of the last set with good form. If you can’t complete the required number of reps, then the weight is too heavy and if you can complete more than the required number of reps, then the weight is too light.

How Many Days Per Week?

Starting out, I would recommend 3 days per week on non-consecutive days. The best days to schedule them would be Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. This would be a good starting point for frequency and recovery. As you get past the first 8 weeks and are noticing your lifts start to stagnate, then you can start to increase frequency.

If you would like to push yourself a little more and can handle it, 4 days per week on non-consecutive days would be great. This would be Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday for example. It’s not necessary to workout every day, so pick the days that you think will work the best for you.

If you decide to workout 4 days per week, I would change the current training program to Friday, Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Again these are just suggestions. You can choose whatever days of the week you want to workout, but try not to workout with too much of a gap between them.

What About cardio?

You can do cardio on your off days or after your lifting days. If you want to do it on your off days, then do a little but don’t over do it. 20-30 minutes at a moderate pace is plenty. This will help increase your overall endurance and stamina which will be useful for the running part of this program.

If you feel like you need more cardio, then you can always add it in on your lifting days too. Don’t over do it though. A 10-20 minute jog at a moderate pace before you lift shouldn’t hurt anything, but don’t over do it. You need to save some energy to lift the heavy weights.

The Program

There are two different programs that you can follow based on your goals. They both incorporate the same exercises, but they have you lifting heavy for gaining size and strength or lifting a little lighter with more repetitions for definition and endurance.

Remember to warm up properly before starting the first exercise and cool down after finishing the last. For a proper warm up you should be doing 5-10 minutes of light cardio and then your first set of 10-20 reps at 20-50% of the weight you plan on using for that exercise.

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For the first program focus on gaining mass and strength. Complete 3 sets of 5 reps for each exercise. After a month or two if you feel like you need more, then you can add a 4th set.

For the second program, add more repetitions to each set and continue with that pattern until you are doing 50 reps per set. Once you can perform all 50 reps with good form, then move the weight up to a heavier one.

After a month or two, test your one rep max on each exercise and when it goes up by 5-10 lbs then start back at 3 sets of 5 and work your way back up to 50 reps per set.

For gaining mass, stick with the 3 sets of 5 reps until you can do it easily for all three exercises. If you start to lose strength or endurance, then drop the weight a little and work your way back up to it.

If you find you don’t respond well to over training by getting too large and bulky with too much muscle, then stop the program after 8 weeks and take at least 3 months off from any type of heavy lifting. Also make sure you’re eating plenty of food and taking in enough protein.

Remember that steroids and other supplements won’t make you bigger or stronger if you’re not eating enough food.

Don’t be misled by the magazines and advertisements promising a steroid like effect from certain supplements. If it was that easy, then everyone would do it and nobody would be impressive in sports or bodybuilding anymore.

Now on to the programs…

Beginner Mass Building Program

Monday – Chest & Back

Incline Barbell Bench Press – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Decline Barbell Bench Press – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

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Wide Grip Pull Ups (If chin cannot reach bar, then add chairs to bring your hips up to the level) – 4 sets of 5-10 reps

Narrow Grip Bent Over Barbell Rows – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

T-Bar Rows – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Tuesday – Legs & Abs

Squats – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Lunges – 3 sets of 5-10 reps (each leg)

Calf Raises – 3 sets of 10-20 reps

Sit Ups – 4 sets of 25-50 reps

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Plank – 1 minute as long as you can hold it (as long as you can go without dropping to your knees or letting your hips drop, then add time)

Wednesday – OFF

Thursday – Shoulders & Traps

Military Press – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Seated Dumbbell Press – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Lateral Raises – 3 sets of 10-20 reps

Barbell Shrugs – 4 sets of 5-10 reps

Power Shrugs – 3 sets of 8-12 reps

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Friday – Arms

Barbell Curls – 4 sets of 5-10 reps

Hammer Curls – 4 sets of 5-10 reps

Tricep Rope Pull Down – 3 sets of 10-20 reps

Tricep Push Downs – 4 sets of 10-20 reps

Overhead Tricep Extension – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Saturday & Sunday – Rest

Intermediate Mass Building Program (add this onto your current routine if under 1 year)

Monday – Chest & Back

Incline Barbell Bench Press – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

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Weighted Dips – 2 sets of 5-8 reps

Flat Barbell Bench Press – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Weighted Pull Ups – 2 sets of 5-8 reps

Narrow Grip Lat Pull Down – 3 sets of 8-12 reps

T-Bar Rows – 2 sets of 8-12 reps

Deadlifts – 2 sets of 5-10 reps

Tuesday – Legs & Abs

Squats – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Lunges – 3 sets of 5-10 reps (each leg)

Calf Raises – 3 sets of 10-20 reps

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Abdominal Crunches – 4 sets of 25-50 reps

Sit Ups – 4 sets of 25-50 reps

Plank – 1 minute as long as you can hold it (as long as you can go without dropping to your knees or letting your hips drop, then add time)

Wednesday – OFF

Thursday – Arms

Barbell Bicep Curls – 4 sets of 5-10 reps

Hammer Grip Bicep Curls – 4 sets of 5-10 reps

Barbell Preacher Curls – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Tricep Push Downs – 4 sets of 10-20 reps

Skull Crushers – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Barbell Tricep Extensions – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

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Dumbbell Tricep Kickbacks – 3 sets of 10-15 reps

Friday – Shoulders & Traps

Barbell Shoulder Press – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Lateral Raises – 3 sets of 10-20 reps

Rear Delt Raises – 3 sets of 10-20 reps

Barbell Shrugs – 4 sets of 5-10 reps

Power Shrugs – 3 sets of 8-12 reps

Saturday – Legs & Abs

Squats – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Lunges – 3 sets of 5-10 reps (each leg)

Calf Raises – 3 sets of 10-20 reps

Abdominal Crunches – 4 sets of 25-50 reps

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Sit Ups – 4 sets of 25-50 reps

Plank – 1 minute as long as you can hold it (as long as you can go without dropping to your knees or letting your hips drop, then add time)

Sunday – Rest

Endurance Mass Building Program (add this onto your current routine if under 1 year)

Monday – Chest, Shoulders & Abs

Barbell Bench Press – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Flat Barbell Bench Press – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Incline Barbell Bench Press – 2 sets of 5-10 reps (increase weight each set)

Military Press – 2 sets of 5-10 reps (increase weight each set)

Barbell Shrugs – 4 sets of 5-10 reps

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Barbell Front Raises – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Standing Side Lateral Raises – 2 sets of 10-15 reps (increase weight each set)

Abdominal Crunches – 5 sets of 25-50 reps (get a training buddy to sit on your feet and stretch your arms in different positions)

Tuesday – Legs, Calves & Abs

Barbell Squat – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Lunges – 2 sets of 8-12 reps (each leg)

Standing Leg Curls – 2 sets of 10-15 reps

Donkey Calf Raises – 4 sets of 6-10 reps

Abdominal Crunches – 5 sets of 25-50 reps (get a training buddy to sit on your feet and stretch your arms in different positions)

Wednesday – OFF

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Thursday – Back, Traps & Abs

Deadlifts – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Weighted Pull Ups – 2 sets of 5-10 reps (add weight if possible)

Bent Over Rows – 2 sets of 5-10 reps

Shrugs – 4 sets of 5-10 reps

Barbell Upright Rows – 2 sets of 8-12 reps

Hyperextensions – 3 sets of 15-20 reps

Abdominal Crunches – 5 sets of 25-50 reps (get a training buddy to sit on your feet and stretch your arms in different positions)

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Friday – Cardio & Arms

Any Type Of Cardio – 30-60 minutes

Bicep Barbell Curls – 4 sets of 5-10 reps

Barbell Bench Preacher Curls – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Dumbbell Concentration Curls – 2 sets of 5-10 reps (add weight if possible)

Tricep Pushdowns – 4 sets of 10-20 reps

Skull Crushers – 2 sets of 5-10 reps

Barbell Tricep Extensions – 3 sets of 5-10 reps (add weight if possible)

Saturday – OFF

Sunday – Rest

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Cardio & Lean Mass Building Program (add this onto your current routine if under 1 year)

Monday – Chest, Shoulders & Calves

Flat Barbell Bench Press – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Weighted Dips – 2 sets of 5-10 reps (add weight if possible)

Incline Dumbbell Press – 2 sets of 8-12 reps

Standing Military Press – 2 sets of 8-12 reps (add weight if possible)

Lateral Raises (with Dumbbells) – 2 sets of 8-12 reps (add weight if possible)

Barbell Front Raises – 2 sets of 8-12 reps (add weight if possible)

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Standing Calf Raises – 4 sets of 10-15 reps (add weight if possible)

Tuesday – Legs, Biceps & Triceps

Barbell Squats – 3 sets of 5-10 reps (add weight if possible)

Lunges – 2 sets of 8-12 reps (each leg) (add weight if possible)

Barbell French Press – 2 sets of 8-12 reps (add weight if possible)

Deadlifts – 2 sets of 5-10 reps (add weight if possible)

Barbell Curls – 3 sets of 5-10 reps (add weight if possible)

Barbell Bench Dips – 3 sets of 5-10 reps

Tricep Pushdowns – 3 sets of 10-15 reps (add weight if possible)

Rope Pulldowns – 2 sets of 15-20 reps

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Wednesday – Chest, Biceps & Triceps

Incline Barbell Bench Press – 3 sets of 5-10 reps (add weight if possible)

Barbell Rows – 2 sets of 8-12 reps (add weight if possible)

Hammer Strength Machine Press – 2 sets of 8-12 reps (add weight if possible)

Barbell Curls – 3 sets of 5-10 reps (add weight if possible)

Dumbbell Concentration Curls – 2 sets of 5-10 reps (add weight if possible)

Skull Crushers – 2 sets of 5-10 reps (add weight if possible)

Rope Pushdowns – 3 sets of 10-15 reps (add weight if possible)

Thursday – Legs, Calves & Shoulders

Barbell Squats – 3 sets of 5-10 reps (add weight if possible)

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Lunges – 2 sets of 8-12 reps (each leg) (add weight if possible)

Standing Leg Curls – 2 sets of 10-15 reps

Barbell Shoulder Press – 2 sets of 8-12 reps (add weight if possible)

Barbell Upright Rows – 2 sets of 8-12 reps (add weight if possible)

Barbell Shrugs – 4 sets of 5-10 reps (add weight if possible)

Barbell Calf Raises – 4 sets of 10-15 reps (add weight if possible)

Friday – Arms, Abs & Cardio

Tricep Dips – 2 sets of 8-12 reps (add weight if possible)

Barbell Wrist Curls – 2 sets of 8-12 reps (add weight if possible)

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Abdominal Crunches – 5 sets of 25-50 reps (get a training buddy to sit on your feet and stretch your arms in different positions)

Barbell Bicep Curls – 2 sets of 8-12 reps (add weight if possible)

Barbell Reverse Wrist Curls – 2 sets of 8-12 reps (add weight if possible)

Tricep Dumbbell Extensions – 2 sets of 8-12 reps (add weight if possible)

Standing Biceps Cable Curls – 2 sets of 8-12 reps (add weight if possible)

Saturday – Rest

Sunday – Rest

Frequency:

Total Days Worked Out Per Week: 4

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Total Minutes Per Day: 180-270

Recommended Days Off: 1-2

Notes On The Program:

This program can be used at any fitness level, but it is especially good for beginners. I like it because it gives balance to your muscles, rather than just pounding them into the ground. It is also a good program for losing weight and getting into shape, as it uses light weights to give your muscles a pulsating stretch. If you need to add more work, feel free to do light cardio before or after any of your weight lifting days.

Also, just because the schedule tells you to do something for a specific amount of sets and reps, does not mean you cannot increase or decrease said weight or reps during your workout. Your body will tell you what it wants that day, and you should listen to it.

P.H.E.A.V.E.N.

= Proper, Holistic, Evaluation, Adjustment, Verification, and New Beginning

Proper:

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Everyone wants to look like they have an incredible physique but a true fitness lifestyle takes so much more than just training a certain body part or drinking a particular type of supplement. If you want to achieve your goals in this industry you need to be prepared to live the lifestyle and that means proper eating, sleeping, and training.

Holistic:

This word is very important in our industry. I cannot tell you how many people I see in the gym everyday that are wasting their time. They either have no clue what they are doing, or they think that they don’t need to take care of their diet as long as they train really hard. You have to remember, your body is a system and if one part isn’t working, then nothing is working.

Evaluation:

This step is very important when it comes to your training.

First, we need to ask why you are training in the first place? What are your goals? Am I looking to just lose weight or am I looking to increase my strength?

Once you figure out your goals then you can start to set up a program to get you there.

We will also need to ask, what are your weaknesses? Are you weak in core? Upper body? Lower Body?

Whatever the case may be, you need to find a way to bring up those weaknesses.

Adjustment:

Once you have completed your program it is very important to go back and see what you did right and what you did wrong. For instance, you may have found out that your upper body is far stronger than your lower, so maybe in your next program you should do some more exercises that focus on the upper body and less on the lower.

Verification:

Once you have made the proper adjustments to the program and you go back and re-test your maxes, you need to go back and verify that your numbers are in fact better than before. If they are not, this may mean that the program you have created is not suited for your fitness level or goals and you will need to make adjustments until it is.

Sources & references used in this article:

Barbarians, gentlemen and players: A sociological study of the development of rugby football by E Dunning, K Sheard – 2005 – books.google.com

Kill the body, the head will fall: A closer look at women, violence, and aggression by R Denfeld – 2009 – books.google.com

Regulating ‘unruly’ bodies: work tasks, conflict and violence in Britain’s night‐time economy1 by LF Monaghan – The British Journal of Sociology, 2002 – Wiley Online Library

Less to Lose and More to Gain?: Men and Boys Violence Prevention Research Project by M Carmody, M Salter, GH Presterudstuen – 2014 – researchdirect.westernsydney.edu …

The role of sports for violence prevention: sport club participation and violent behaviour among adolescents by M Mutz, J Baur – International journal of sport policy, 2009 – Taylor & Francis

Decivilizing, civilizing or informalizing? The international development of Mixed Martial Arts by R Sánchez García, D Malcolm – International review for the …, 2010 – journals.sagepub.com

French rugby football: A cultural history by P Dine – 2001 – books.google.com

Violence, risk, and liability in male sports culture by K Young – Sociology of sport journal, 1993 – journals.humankinetics.com