What Are You Really Hungry For? 4 Things Other Than Food You Might Be Craving

What Are You Really Hungry For? 4 Things Other Than Food You Might Be Craving?

The word “hungry” is used to refer to the desire for food or drink. It’s usually followed by the words “for”, “in” or “to”. These four meanings are all valid. They’re not mutually exclusive though! There are other uses of the term too, but they don’t really have any bearing on hunger at all. So let’s get into it.

1) To mean: to want something badly enough that you’ll go out of your way to obtain it.

2) To mean: to have strong feelings about something, especially if those feelings are negative.

3) To mean: to be angry with someone or something; to dislike them intensely.

4) A verb form which means “to eat.

In English, there are many different ways to say these four meanings of the word. However, I think that the most common usage is when referring to a person or thing having strong feelings about something. So here we go:

To mean: to want something badly enough that you’ll go out of your way to obtain it.

You might have heard this one before, but it’s still worth repeating because it’s so useful!

What Are You Really Hungry For? 4 Things Other Than Food You Might Be Craving - GymFitWorkout

It’s quite useful because it’s broad enough to be used in a lot of different situations. For example, here are some conversations you might have had or see on TV:

A girl goes into a shop and tells the shopkeeper, “I’m hungry for a chocolate bar.” The shopkeeper gives her a chocolate bar for free.

You’re on vacation in another country and you get lost. You see a house. You walk up to the door and say to the owner, “I’m hungry for help.” The person invites you in and helps you get back to your hotel.

You’re walking through a park on your way home from school when you see a group of people playing ultimate Frisbee. It looks like fun so you want to play but you’ve never played before. You go over to them and say, “I’m hungry to learn how to play!”

Sources & references used in this article:

The phenomenology of food cravings: the role of mental imagery by M Tiggemann, E Kemps – Appetite, 2005 – Elsevier

Food cravings discriminate differentially between successful and unsuccessful dieters and non-dieters. Validation of the Food Cravings Questionnaires in German by A Meule, A Lutz, C Vögele, A Kübler – Appetite, 2012 – Elsevier

Assessment of food cravings by A Meule – Processed food addiction: foundations, assessment …, 2018 – researchgate.net

Piece of cake. Cognitive reappraisal of food craving by NR Giuliani, RD Calcott, ET Berkman – Appetite, 2013 – Elsevier

Chocolate craving and liking by P Rozin, E Levine, C Stoess – Appetite, 1991 – cpb-us-w2.wpmucdn.com

The development and validation of Spanish versions of the state and trait food cravings questionnaires by A Cepeda-Benito, DH Gleaves, MC Fernández… – … Research and Therapy, 2000 – Elsevier

Food insecurity as a barrier to sustained antiretroviral therapy adherence in Uganda by SD Weiser, DM Tuller, EA Frongillo, J Senkungu… – PloS one, 2010 – journals.plos.org