What Makes Masters Competition Different From Regular Competition

What makes the IBJJF Master’s Cup different from regular competition?

The IBJJF Master’s Cup is a series of competitions organized by the International Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Federation (IBJJF). The purpose of these competitions are to promote and develop the sport of BJJ worldwide. These events have been held since 1996 with a total prize fund of $1 million dollars.

How many competitors participate in each event? How much money do they win?

There are three main categories: Open, Women & Men. Each category consists of four divisions. The men compete in open division; women in womens division and the master’s class winners take part in the masters division. There are two weight classes: light and heavyweight. The weight classes are determined by the number of IBJJF black belts competing at any given tournament or competition.

Who organizes the IBJJF Master’s Cup?

The IBJJF organizes all Master’s Cups. The organization is based in Brazil and it was founded in 1992 by Renzo Gracie, a famous Brazilian Jiu Jitsu instructor. Since then, the organization has grown rapidly and now includes over 200 members around the world. The IBJJF also holds several other tournaments such as the Pan American Championships, European Championship and World Pro Trials. The organization is also responsible for overseeing other major tournaments such as the World Championships, Pan American Championships and European Championship.

What is the format of an IBJJF Master’s Cup?

The master’s class has four divisions: the men’s open division, the women’s division, the men’s masters division and the women’s masters division. The number of competitors in each division varies from one event to another. Any competitors that don’t have a black belt are in the open division. Athletes that are awarded a black belt can compete in either the open or the master’s division, but only after completing two years in the black belt division and four years as a brown belt. However, athletes that win an open class can skip the black belt division and compete directly in the masters class after two years.

How many medals are awarded at an Master’s Cup?

The number of medals awarded for each division depends on the size of the event. However, there are always four gold medals given in each category. In addition, an award is given to the competitors who win at least three of their matches. Depending on the size and importance of the event, a silver award or bronze award might also be given to the winners who lost only one match.

When are Master’s Cups? Are they held every year?

Master’s Cups are held throughout the year. The competition is divided into two parts: the World Master’s Cup, which is held in the summer, and the World Pro Cup, which takes place in the winter. Both competitions consist of eight weight divisions and both have a prize fund of $100,000 dollars. In addition, both events are held in different locations around the world. The World Pro Cup is held in the United States and Canada, while the World Master’s Cup is held anywhere from Europe to South America.

How can I get involved in Master’s Cups?

Master’s cups are open to anyone that has a black belt in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. However, you must be at least 21 years of age to compete. Athletes who win an award in a previous competition are not allowed to compete again until the next year’s event. Also, competitors who have previously won a black belt world championship are not eligible to compete in the World Master’s Cup.

What are the rules for Master’s cups?

Master’s Cups have the same rules as a regular BJJ competition. Each match lasts for five minutes, with the exception of the final match in any division, which lasts for ten minutes. Competitors must weigh in before each match and they are not allowed to weigh more than 7% above the weight division they are competing in. In addition, competitors are not allowed to use any technique that causes excessive injury or that puts their opponent in a dangerous position.

What are the benefits of participating in Master’s Cups?

The prizes for winning Master’s Cups are substantial. In addition to the money awarded to the winners of each division, all competitors receive a medal, as well as a large trophy for their school. The competition itself is an excellent way to test your skill against other martial artists of the highest caliber. Finally, winning a Master’s Cup can increase the reputation of your school and bring in new students from around the world.

What is the World Pro Cup?

The World Pro Cup is an event organized by the International Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Federation. The competition consists of eight weight divisions and awards a prize money of $100,000 dollars to the competitors that win their matches. In addition, the winner of each match can choose between a custom championship belt or a check for $2,000 dollars. The World Pro Cup is held in the United States and Canada.

How do I get involved in the World Pro Cup?

The World Pro Cup is open to any practitioner of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu that is at least 21 years of age. In order to compete, you must fill out an application before the event. You can find an application on IBJJF website. The main tournaments have more applicants than available slots so not everyone can participate. You can also earn a spot in one of the tournaments by winning a medal at a prior Pro Cup. Winning a medal at one of the big tournaments (Sao Paulo, Pan Americans, Euros or Japanese Nationals) is also enough to gain entry into the Master’s World Cup.

What are the rules for the World Pro Cup?

The World Pro Cup rules are very similar to regular IBJJF tournaments. Matches last five minutes and competitors must weigh in before each match. Most importantly, all techniques that put your opponent in danger of injury are banned. For instance, it is not allowed to lock in a submission hold and twist the arm until the shoulder is torn from the socket. Also banned is any move that compresses the spine past its normal range of motion.

What are the benefits of participating in World Pro Cup?

The World Pro Cup offers substantial monetary rewards to competitors who win their divisions and place among the top competitors. Winning the division yields a first place check of $10,000 dollars. Second place wins $5,000 dollars and third place wins $2,000 dollars. In addition, any competitor who wins more than one match during the course of the competition receives a bonus check for $2,000 dollars.

How do I get involved in the World Master’s Cup?

Like the main tournaments, there are slots for competitors from each country. Each country can decide how they want to select their representatives. In the United States, the winners of each division at the US Open are guaranteed a spot in the World Master’s Cup. The remaining spots are then awarded based on a points system. A gold medal at the US Open is worth five points, a silver medal is worth three points and a bronze medal is worth one point.

What are the rules for the World Master’s Cup?

The rules for the Master’s World Cup are the same as the regular IBJJF rules except that matches last for six minutes. There is also an extra weight division for each gender and more prizes are awarded to the competitors. The first, second and third place finishers in each division win a cash prize. In addition, competitors who win their division are given the opportunity to compete in a four person submission only invitational. The winner of this invitational wins $5,000 dollars and an invitation to compete in next year’s World Master’s Cup as well as free entry into that year’s event.

How do I get involved in the World Professional Championship?

The slots for the World Pro Cup are awarded in the same way as the World Master’s Cup. The division champions from the prior year are automatically qualified for the next year’s event. The rest of the spots are awarded based on a points system. A gold medal at the Pro Cup is worth five points, a silver medal is worth three points and a bronze medal is worth one point.

What are the rules for World Pro Cup?

The rules for the World Pro Cup are based on IBJJF’s open weight divisions. The matches last five minutes and there is no extra weight division for heavyweights. All the normal submission guidelines of IBJJF apply. In addition, competitors may not place their thumbs in their opponent’s eye sockets nor may they perform any sort of eye gouge.

How do I get involved in the World League?

The World League is held every three months and qualification can vary from event to event. The World League is intended to crown the best overall competitor on the planet. In addition to cash prizes, the winner of World League earns the right to wear a black belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. In the past, the winner of this award has been randomly selected by a computer program that selects a name out of a hat. Recently, however, it was determined that this method was not fair to competitors who may have been defeated early in the competition yet were still eligible for the random draw. In order to fix this problem, it was decided that every World League winner after the fact would be awarded the black belt automatically. In addition, the World League winner is given the right to choose who receives the next belt.

How do I get involved in The Super Brawl?

The exact qualification process for The Super Brawl can be a bit confusing so pay attention. The winners from each weight class at the annual Pacific Championships are awarded with a spot in Super Brawl. The division winners from the prior year who did not win their division at the Pacific Championships are also awarded with a spot in Super Brawl. Finally, the top eight competitors from the prior year’s Super Brawl are awarded with a spot in the next Super Brawl. In other words, if you win your division at the Pacifics or place in the top three, you are awarded one of the ten spots in the Super Brawl the following year. If you earn the top eight placing at the prior year’s Super Brawl, you do not receive a free entry into the next Super Brawl. You still have to go through the Pacific Championships to get back in. The Super Brawl Champion, however, is awarded with an automatic six month extension on his or her career.

How do I get involved in the Black Belt League?

The exact qualification process for the Black Belt League can be a bit confusing so pay attention. The winners from each weight class at the annual Black Belt Championships are awarded with a spot in the Black Belt League. The division winners from the prior year who did not win their division at the Black Belt Championships are also awarded with a spot in the Black Belt League. Finally, the top eight competitors from the prior year’s Black Belt League are awarded with a spot in the next Black Belt League. In other words, if you win your division at the Black Belt Championships or place in the top three, you are awarded one of the ten spots in the next Black Belt League. If you earn the top eight placing at the prior year’s Black Belt League, you do not receive a free entry into the next Black Belt League. You still have to go through the Black Belt Championships to get back in.

How do I get ranked?

If you are a grappler and you have never wrestled or grappled competitively in any form, then when you first walk into the academy, you will be asked to fill out a brief questionnaire. You will then be assigned a ranking based on your knowledge of positions and technique. While this may seem somewhat demeaning, rest assured that it is indeed better to be an average beginner than a experienced loser!

What is the ranking system?

The ranking system at the Hartwick grappler is a meritocracy. In other words, you get ranked according to how well you roll. At each level, you are expected to know the previous level’s material. Your instructor will make sure of this.

In order to be eligible for promotion, you need to get majority of the instructor’s votes.

Sources & references used in this article:

‘Non-local’masters games participants: an investigation of competitive active sport tourist motives by P Gillett, S Kelly – Journal of sport tourism, 2006 – Taylor & Francis

Masters sport as a strategy for managing the aging process by RA Dionigi – The masters athlete: Understanding the role of sport …, 2010 – books.google.com

“Older and faster”: Exploring elite masters cyclists’ involvement in competitive sport by KM Appleby, K Dieffenbach – The Sport Psychologist, 2016 – journals.humankinetics.com

Competitive sport as leisure in later life: Negotiations, discourse, and aging by R Dionigi – Leisure sciences, 2006 – Taylor & Francis

Masters’ Games—The Nature of Competitors’ Involvement and Requirements by C Ryan, T Lockyer – Event Management, 2002 – ingentaconnect.com