Why Non-Contact ACL Injuries Should Never Happen

Non Contact Acl Injury Mechanism:

A non-contact acl injury occurs when there is no force applied to the joint during the injury. This type of injury happens due to several reasons. One reason could be due to one’s own body weight being placed on the injured area or it could be because of external forces such as impact from another person, vehicle, etc. Another reason could be due to improper technique.

The most common causes of non-contact acl injury are:

1) Poor Technique – There is no force applied to the joint during the injury.

It may happen due to poor technique. For example, if someone does not keep their knee straight when they land after jumping up from a jump rope. This will result in them landing with their knee bent instead of straightening out their leg before landing.

2) Over-stretching – If the muscles are stretched too much, then they will pull on the tendons and ligaments causing pain.

3) Lack of Balance – When someone lands with their foot too far forward or backward, it results in a loss of balance which will cause pain.

4) Muscle Weakness – If the muscles around the knee are too weak, they will not be able to support the knee when landing or doing any type of movement.

5) Old Age – Sometimes, people’s bodies just wear down over time and become more susceptible to injuries.

Non-contact acl injuries are becoming more common with younger people who tend to do a lot of jumping, hopping and explosive movements which can result in knee injuries.

What is the Non-contact ACL injury definition?

The definition of non-contact acl injury is when there is no force applied to the knee during the injury. It can happen due to weak muscles, old age, or improper technique. There are many causes of non-contact acl injuries. Most non-contact acl injuries happen in young people who participate in sports that require a lot of jumping and landing on your feet from high places.

What is the What is ACL non-contact Injury definition?

The what is acl non-contact injury definition describes when you do not land correctly from a jump or from straightening your leg, this can cause your knee to twist in such a way that it injures the ACL.

How common are non-contact ACL injuries?

It is very common for a person to suffer a non-contact acl injury. There are many instances where this happens. Most non-contact acl injuries happen in people between the ages of 12 and 35. This is especially true for athletes who participate in sports that require a lot of jumping and twisting such as basketball, volleyball, soccer and dancing.

Of all non-contact acl injuries, how many occur in women vs men?

While men are more likely to suffer an injury because of external forces, women are more likely to suffer from non-contact injuries.

What is the Non-Contact ACL Injury Recovery time?

The non-contact acl injury recovery time depends on how bad the injury is. If someone suffers a mild injury, then it may just take a few weeks for full recovery. If someone suffers a severe injury, then it can take up to a year or longer. Most non-contact acl injuries heal in 4-9 months.

What is the Non-Contact ACL Injury Healing Time?

The non-contact acl injury healing time is usually around 4-9 months. It takes a long time for the knee to heal because there are so many structures in the knee that can get torn.

What is the Non-Contact ACL Injury Treatment?

Non-contact acl injuries are treated with R.I.C.E, ice, medication, crutches and sometimes surgery. The medicine is to control swelling and relieve pain. R.I.C.E stands for rest, ice, compression, and elevation. This helps promote healing and reduce swelling and pain. Crutches are used when the patient cannot put any weight on the knee because it would be too painful. Surgery is usually only required if the bone has been severely damaged or if the ligament does not heal correctly without it.

Why Non-Contact ACL Injuries Should Never Happen - gym fit workout

What is the Non-Contact ACL Injury Recovery?

Sources & references used in this article:

The anterior cruciate ligament injury controversy: is “valgus collapse” a sex-specific mechanism? by CE Quatman, TE Hewett – British journal of sports medicine, 2009 – bjsm.bmj.com

Barriers to predicting the mechanisms and risk factors of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury by N Ali, G Rouhi – The open biomedical engineering journal, 2010 – ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

A comparison of knee joint motion patterns between men and women in selected athletic tasks by RA Malinzak, SM Colby, DT Kirkendall, B Yu… – Clinical …, 2001 – Elsevier

Risk factors and prevention strategies of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injuries by C Laible, OH Sherman – Bulletin of the NYU Hospital for …, 2014 – presentationgrafix.com

Mechanisms of non-contact ACL injuries by B Yu, WE Garrett – British journal of sports medicine, 2007 – bjsm.bmj.com